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Full text of "Modern Music Series Primer"

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3Hje iiflotjcni fBugic Series 



A PRIMER OF VOCAL MUSIC 



WHEREIN THE STUDY OF MUSICAL STRUCTURE IS PURSUED 

THROUGH THE CONSIDERATION OF COMPLETE MELODIC 

FORMS AND PRACTICE BASED ON EXERCISES 

RELATED TO THEM 



BY 



ELEANOR SMITH 



AUTHOR OF "SONGS FOR LITTLE CHILDREN," TEACHER OF MUSIC IN THE CHICAGO KINDERGARTEN 
COLLEGE AND FROEBEL'S KINDERGARTEN SCHOOL. FORMERLY IN CHARGE 
OF DEPARTMENT OF VOCAL MUSIC IN THE COOK 
COUNTY NORMAL SCHOOL 




SILVER, BURDETT AND COMPANY 

NEW YORK BOSTON CHICAGO 



Copyright, 1898,1899,1900 
By SCOTT, FORESMAN & COMPANY 

Copyright, 1901 
Be SILVER, BURDETT & COMPANY 



INTRODUCTION. 

The degree of ability attained in any department of knowledge depends 
finally upon the amount of effort put forth ; for whatever may be said of the 
value of " influence and culture/' the only real training the individual receives, 
from the standpoint of educational results, is that acquired by independent 
effort. 

The all-important principle in education, however, lies back of this ques- 
tion of effort, and concerns the means by which this effort is aroused, and the 
material upon which it is based. This principle, stated broadly, is that the 
content of all our knowledge is primarily derived from experience, and that 
the quality of our ideas corresponds with the quality of the things by which 
we have been influenced. It is not sufficient for those who are responsible for 
the education of children to say that their pupils can do this or that admir- 
ably, with precision and despatch, for these very qualities may mean the 
violation of some principle of natural healthful development ; so that, when 
we say a child can read music correctly and rapidly, it is but proper that 
we should examine the processes by which he has learned, and should test 
carefully the quality of material on which his study has been based, that we 
may satisfy ourselves whether the work done will stand the test of art educa- 
tion for the child. 

Some would test the child's progress in music by the mere ability to read 
at sight, and would consider it sufficient if to this mere power of utterance were 
added a semblance of proper expression. They forget that these qualities 
of correct expression and artistic ideals cannot be added to mere ability as 
decorations are added to wood or stone. They must be born through the spirit 
of the endeavor that brought power to the individual. This principle is not a 
new one in education, and it seems strange that in all the different branches 
this battle must be fought over. Nearly every branch of education has already 
been reformed by the force of these simple truths ; and it is almost unaccount- 
able that music, the most sensitive of the arts, the language of the emotions, 
should be the last to conform to them. 

The first essential, then, is that the child should have a sufficient musical 
experience as the basis for his training ; the second, that his interest, aroused 
through this experience, should be properly directed so that he may be devel- 
oped in a knowledge of music and its elements. 



INTRODUCTION. 



The author of the Modern Music Series assumes that children possess 
musical instincts that demand recognition at the beginning, and that they are 
entitled to the best in music as well as the best in literature ; that they can be 
taught to read music through the use of simple, beautiful melodies, instead of 
exercises and songs made for the occasion, and that practice makes a deeper 
impression on the child if it is secured through melodies that appeal to him, 
and awaken in him the true spirit of song. It is not necessary, in order to pave 
the way for future development, to weaken the character of the music used. 

As the co-ordination of the study of art, history, geography, and literature 
reenforces the power of the mind through the reaction of each upon the other, 
so the use of interesting melodies stimulates the effort to grasp the elements of 
which they are composed. 

The Modern Music Series, instead of requiring children to advance through 
exercises which confine their activities to purely mechanical processes, fur- 
nishes an opportunity for practice of the highest order, and at the same time 
gives the children pure melody at each step. 

The conclusion is that technique in music, like all formal sides of vital art, 
to be rightly learned, must be gained from observation and study in the art 
itself, and consequently all knowledge and power must be derived from and 
related to actual experience in song. It is only when songs are presented im- 
providently, at the expense of the child's understanding, that the true pedago- 
gical end is defeated. But if song is used according to a pedagogical plan, it 
may be made to reveal to the pupil all the elements of which it is composed. 



SUGGESTIONS TO TEACHERS. 

In this volume the children should learn, by imitation, to sing and enjoy the 
melodies to be found in Part I. They should then make observations upon the 
rhythm, by recognizing its pulses, with hand-beat or some other way, and of 
the tonal characteristics by comparing the simpler phrases with the scale itself. 
This may be presented orally, or indicated from a tone-ladder or similar device. 
In this way, through singing, the children will become familiar with different 
kinds of rhythm (double, triple, etc.), and with the simpler intervals of the 
scale. This training in the recognition of form should be carried on until the 
children have acquired a vocabulary of typical forms which can be sung with 
the same freedom and spontaneity with which they sing their songs. The 
attention of the children may be directed to the characters upon the staff, and 
they may learn to follow the simpler scale passages and intervals through the 
notes which represent them. The more definite study of the staff notation, 
however, should be reserved for Part II. 



INTRODUCTION. 5 

Having acquired familiarity with the elements of time and tune, so that 
through singing, observation, and finally, definite practice, they are known 
and recognized, the child may be expected in Part II. to use and test the knowl- 
edge and power thus gained. In fact, the experiences in Parts I. and II. 
may be quite closely related ; and it will be found, perhaps, that the best pro- 
gress can be made by furnishing opportunity e .j„ .uciependent effort, as given 
in Part II., almost from the beginning of Part I. 

In Part II. much of the very simplest song material has been provided. 
Each little melody presents its own problem — its scale fragment, intervals, 
and rhythmic contrasts. These occur again and again in different tunes and 
in various combinations, and each time they are identified they become more 
surely a part of the child's musical vocabulary. The fact of their forming a 
part of some interesting song-story serves to impress them more firmly upon 
the mind of the pupil. 

In Part III. many of the songs are too difficult to be sung entirely by note, 
but may be learned partly by imitation and partly by note. Among these are 
songs of the seasons, and songs for special occasions. 

The three parts in this volume admit of six essential modes of procedure, 
viz. : 

1. Rote singing. Spontaneous rote singing should be an important feature 
of the daily music lesson in all the primary grades. It should be practiced 
frequently in any grade when it is necessary to put the children in a melodic 
frame of mind. 

2. Song-inspired interval drill. The children should learn to sing short 
melodic phrases (intervals and scale fragments), the relation of such phrases 
to the song on the one hand and the scale on the other to be made plain to 
them at all times. A good many songs will have to be treated in this way 
and the process followed up by careful drill, the teacher having clearly in 
mind at all times the object to be accomplished. All interval practice should 
be given with melodic progressions in view. 

3. Sight singing. For this purpose Part II. furnishes an abundance of 
varied and simple melody. In order that the children may be trained to think 
melodically, they should at first receive frequent help from the teacher. 

4. Singing by note and by ear in combination. During the early stages of 
sight-reading simple melodies should be taught, first by imitation and then 
sung with their syllables. The teacher thereupon shows the children the 
written expression of the melody, pointing to the notes in the meantime. 
While this process alone will not develop independence, it is necessary in 
order to encourage flexibility of thought, and to make a connecting link be- 
tween spontaneous expression and intellectual effort. The children should 
be required frequently to imitate the teacher in singing familiar tunes with 



6 INTRODUCTION. 

syllables instead of words. By this means they will learn to associate scale 
names with scale passages and intervals. 

5. The study of songs by note and by rote. There are many beautiful, easy 
songs that are valuable for sight-singing practice, although they contain a 
phrase, or possibly a line, too difficult for the children to read. While the 
mechanical teacher would discard such songs, because they do not conform to 
his ideas of gradation, they are most valuable, because they give the children 
glimpses of higher ideals as they go along. The easy lines, therefore, should 
be sung by note, and the teacher should come to the rescue when the more 
difficult passages are reached. 

6. Writing melodies from memory. Written work is a valuable aid to the 
memory. Children will acquire a more definite knowledge of the staff notation 
by the practice of writing music. Intervals are thus visualized, and become 
more firmly fixed in the mind. After the children have acquired a fair 
vocabulary of type forms that can be sung at call, or from the staff, they 
should be required to write very simple melodies that they know by heart. 
Short phrases should be dictated at first, such as the following : 




musm 



The teacher may also dictate melodies by calling the scale names. The 
latter process, of course, is not an ear test. 

Attention is called to " Special Studies " to be found on pages 68 and 69. 

Thus through the three parts of this book the child is led from step to 
step in such a way that he will understand and enjoy music, and acquire the 
power to read and render with expression the songs within his range of 
taste and ability. The methods here outlined are sure to benefit the most 
unmusical children, while they will greatly interest and profit those who 
have a keen appreciation of and love for music. In so far as the author h^s 
accomplished this high aim, and has thus contributed to the enjoyment and 
improvement of the children, will there come satisfaction for this effort. 



TABLE OF CONTEXTS. 



Songs of the Seasons. page 

Autumn Days 118 

Earth's Dresses 54 

Happy Eskimo, The Eleanor Smith 50 

Harvest Time 48 

Indian Summer 48 

Jacky Frost Eleanor Smith 80 

January and February 49 

Joyful Days Wilhelm 72 

May's Coming German 11 

May Time Naegeli 19 

Month of May, The Eleanor Smith 93 

October J. K.G. Loewe 87 

On a Snowy Day Old German 55 

Sleighing Song Old Tune 52 

Snow Bird's Message, The, Carl Wilhelm 12 

Spring is Coming J. A. Martin 32 

Summer or Winter Nursery Songs 29 

Winter's Music German Folksong 14 



Songs of Nature. 

An Explanation Hanoverian Folksong 

Asleep and Awake S. Reid Spencer 

Daisies 

Dew Drop, A W.W. Gilchrist 

Face in the Brook, The 

Fruit I.T. Wilson 

In May Old English 

Lady Daffadown 

Little Pilgrims F. H. Arkurright 

Little Trolls are Spinning. .Eleanor Smith 

Little Gypsy Dandelion . .Eleanor Smith 

Moon, The 

Morning Glory, The G. W. Chadwick 

Mystery, A K.G. Hering 

Naming the Trees Folksong 

Prisoners 

Signs of the Weather Old Folksong 

Song to Venus 

Stars and Dewdrops Witthauer 

Streamlet, The 

Trees, The Ancient Folksong. . . . 

When the Stars Dr. Garrett 



31 
102 

42 
85 

125 
29 
46 
29 
44 

101 
10 
17 
74 
98 
10 
38 
15 
67 
51 
63 
10 

101 



Birds. 

Goldfinch, The Brahms 79 

Humming-Bird, The 60 

L ,dj-Bird French Melody 58 

Mournful Linnets, The. . . .Children's Sangs 42 



PAGE 

Owl, The Ethelbert Nevin 73 

Robin in the Cherry-Tree 1 1 

Robin and the Redbreast, The 47 

Robin's Return Carl Attenhofer 16 

Snowbird, The Reissmann 35 

Swallow, The Folksong 81 

Time to Riso 26 

What the Robin Sings. . . .Eleanor Smith 97 

Woodpecker, The Ethelbert Nevin 82 

Wrens and Robins 23 

Rain. 

Gray Rain 58 

Rain, The G. Jaspersen 37 

Raindrops, The 27 

Rain Song Eleanor Smith 86 

Robin's Rain Song 64 

Signs of Rain German Folksong 36 

Action. 

Dancing Song Rhenish Folksong .... 23 

Dancing Song Folksong 110 

Firemen, The Ethelbert Nevin 88 

Happy Little Alice Eleanor Smith 20 

Journey's End Eugene Loop 22 

Left, Right 49 

Marching 22 

Mill-Wheel, The 30 

Sleigh Ride, A 47 

Windmill, The German Air 14 



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18 

90 

9 

76 



Apple-Tree, The French Folksong 

Blacksmith, The Gruenberger 

Dairy Maids, The Old English Tune . . 

Morning Song English 

Sing a Song of Workshops.. G. W. Chadwick 20 

Work and Play Carl Wilhelm 74 

Play. 

A-Riding Nicolai 64 

Air Ship, The French Folksong 84 

Big Drum, The Mark Seely 15 

Body Guard, The 41 

Bogieman, The Old German 70 

Bouncing Ball 27 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Fairies' Dance, The Eleanor Smith 48 

Jumping Johnny Nursery Rhyme 46 

King of France, The 47 

London Bridge Old Tune 32 

Make-Believe Town Gruenberger 17 

Mix a Pan-Cake CJiildhood Days 38 

My Dolly French Folksong 12 

Open the Gates as High as 

the Sky 78 

Playing Horse 116 

Polly's Piano 26 

Rider on the Rocking- 

Horse Taubert 94 

Ring, The J. W. Elliott 100 

Ring Around a Rosy Reinecke 21 

Three Plum Buns 41 

Young Jasons, The Brandenburg Folk-song 40 

Animals. 

Barnyard, In a 117 

Bunny and Polly 61 

Elephant, The 52 

Frog-making 46 

In a Barnyard 117 

Mouse Cousins 34 

Ponies, The French 52 

Pussy Nursery Songs 27 

Pussy Cat 116 

Pussy Cat, Pussy Cat J. W. Elliott 36 

Squirrel, The German Folksong 30 

Squirrel, The Eleanor Smith 13 

Squirrels' Tea, The French Air 14 

Thank You, Pretty Cow 59 

Miscellaneous. 

Bells in the Steeple 34 

Dream, A 45 

Dustman, The Brahms 125 

Five Little Girls 53 

Gentleness 46 

Hurdy-Gurdy Man, The . . . Carl Wilhelm 57 

Months, The 02 



PAG* 

My Cap ; 81 

Ten O'clock 65 

Tick, Tock Children's Songs 28 

Topsy Turvey John Martin 75 

Insects. 



Bees are Humming 

Butterfly, The Erwin Oehme. 

Friend in Need, A Carl Wilhelm. 

Reason Why, The German 



... 59 

.... 55 

... 66 

... 28 

Silk Worm, The 30 

Spider, The Folksong 23 

Wind. 

Snowing and Blowing German Folksong 34 

Winds of Evening French Melody 13 

Wind, The English 45 

Wind, The IF. IF. Gilchrist 102 

Occasional. 

Bedtime Martin 124 

Bugle Call, The Old German 54 

Child's Thanksgiving, A. . .John Martin 105 

Child's Evensong, A Stainer. .'. 78 

Christmas Bells 44 

Christmas Time John Martin 104 

Christmas Tree, The Myles B. Fostei' 106 

Father-Christmas Folksong 57 

Good News G. Jaspersen 62 

Guardian Angel, The Brahms 108 

Morning Prayer Rheinberger 99 

Morning Song Gersbach 123 

Mother's Prayer Schulz 122 

My Country, 'Tis of Thee. . Carey 109 

Now the Day is Over Rinck 110 

Prayer, A Kreuz 107 

Soldier's Song Old English Game. ... 16 

What a Good Child Says 116 

When the Little Children 

Sleep Reinecke 96 



A PRIMER OF VOCAL MUSIC. 



PART I. 



SONGS FOR IMITATIVE PRACTICE, AND FOR THE OBSERVATION AND 

STUDY OF MUSICAL ELEMENTS. 



The Dairy Maids* 



James Slocum, by permissson. 

Allegretto. 



Old English Tune. 




1. Ev- 'ning light on the pas - ture land, Twink-ling, twink 

2. Cow- bells ring- ing a sleep- y chime, Tink- ling, tink 

3. Sweet and warm is the milk we take, Ev - ery morn 

4. Mak-ing but- ter's the best of fun, Churn -ing, churn 



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Down we go with our pails in hand, Ma - ry,Mol-ly and I. 

While we call o'er the meadow thyme, Ma - ry,Mol-ly and I. 

When the chil-dren be -gin to wake, Ma - ry,Mol-ly and I. 

Oh ! we're sor- ry when summer's done,Ma - ry,Mol-ly and I. 




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Little Gipsy Dandelion. 



Mary N. Prescott. 

From St. Nicholas, by per. of the Century Co 
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Eleanor Smith. 




1. Lit - tie gip - sy dan - de - lion, Dan - cing in the sun, 

2. Lit - tie i - die dan - de - lion, Then I'll mow you down, 

3. "Ah ! I gild the fields a - far In the pleas - ant Spring, 




Have you 
What is 
Shin - ing 



an - y curls to sell? "Not a sin - gle 
it you're good for, pray, With your gold-en 
like the morn-ing star, With the light I 



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crown ? 
bring." 



Naming the Trees. 



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Folksong, 




1. Do you know the trees by name When you see themgrow-ing 

2. Watch them in the ear - ly Spring When their buds are swell-ing, 

3. Watch them la - ter when their leaves Ev -'ry - where are show-ing, 

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In the fields or in the woods? They are well worth know-ing. 
Watch each ti - ny lit - tie leaf Leave its co - sy dwell- ing. 
Soon you'll know the dif-f rent trees When you see themgrow-ing. 



The Trees. 



Translated from the German. 
Allegretto, p 



Ancient Folk Song (1644). 



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1. Good-morn -ing, dear trees, oh ! how chil - ly you 

2. Your chil-dren, the leaves,and your bird-friends are 

3. But cheer up, old friends, May brings rob - in and 



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May's Coming. 



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1. May comes tripping o'er the meadow; May comes laughing o'er the hill; 

2. Ten-cler flow'rs come forth, to greet her, Spread their fragrance where she goes ; 

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Loi-ters 'neath the young leaves' shadow, Plays be- side the wa-ters still. 
Wind-flow'rris-es fair to meet her, Vio -let pale her pur-ple shows. 





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Robin in the Cherry Tree* 



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The Snow Bird's Message. 



Carl Wilhelm, adapted. 




1 . "Springtime's coming ! Spring with her buds, Mist-y green tress - es, 

2. Squir-rels spright-ly Hop from their bed ; Fieldmice are creep-ing, 

3. "Naughty snow-birds," Bun-ni-kins say: "Snowflakes are fly - ing, 
4."Tru - ly, bun - ny, Tru-ly we've seen One dear-est maid - en, 
5. "Springtime's coming, Spring's on the way ! What tho' 'tis snow-ing ? 

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Vi - o - let dress - es : Spring is com - ing In- to the woods. 

Bun-ni-kins peep - ing, Snow birds soft - ly Trill o - ver-head." 

Cold winds are sigh - ing — Spring is com - ing On-ly in play." 

Vi - o - let - la - den, Scat'tring blos-soms O'er valleys green. 

Win-ter is go - ing : Mice and bun - nies Come out and play. 




Mrs. Gilson. 



My Dolly. 



French Folksong. 

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Mol-ly, She's the one I 
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love Most of all, and she's my dove, 
me, Moth-ers always do, you see. 



Winds of Evening* 



13 



From the French. 
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French Melody. 




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Eleanor Smith. 




ver gray, A store 



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1. A coat of fur all 

2. The Spring-time brings me love - ly now'rs,The leaves of 

3. Was ev - er life so rilled with good, Or times so 



nuts so 
Sum-mer 
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hear sweet mu- sic poured in show'rs From birdlings all a - bout 
Au-tumn nuts, or an - y wood So beau - ti - f ul and co 



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Winter's Music. 



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1. Old win-ter's a gay mu - si - cian, His mu - sic's loud and 

2. He car - ols down the chim - ney, He chants in for - ests 

3. He makes a drum of win - dows, A flute of ev - 'ry 




shrill, He whis-tles o'er the moor - land, whis-tles o'e the 
dim, All things old win - ter breathes on,all things old win - ter 
tree, An or - gan of the wood - lands, or - gan of the 

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breathes on, Grow mu - si - cal for 

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The Squirrels' Tea* 




French Air. 



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The Windmill. 



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The Big Drum. 



15 



Malcolm Douglas* 

From " St. Nicholas," by permission 
of The Century Company. 



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boom ! " Who knows,"said he,"when a war will come?"Boom,boom, 



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I'm not at all frightened,you un - der - stand ; But 



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read - y to play in the band." Boom, boom, boom. 



Old English. 

far* 



Signs of the Weather. 



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Old Folksong. 

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If the ev - 'ning's red and the morn - ing's gray, It& a 

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sign of a bon - nie, bon-nie day; If the ev-'ning's gray and the 



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morn-ing's red, The ewe and the lamb will go wet to bed. 



16 



J. R. Mason. 

a > Allamarcia. 



Soldier's Song* 



Old English Game. 







4 



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See the sol-diersmarohing,eome, 
Forth to bat - tie see them go ; 
Each would give for coun- try's sake 
Such a he - ro 1 would be ; 



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Gay flags a-stream-ing 
Brave, firm, and s f ead 



Life 
Yes, 



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when 

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est ad- ly, 

old - er, 

4 




Hear the fife and rolling drum, While sword and lance are gleam-ing. 
They will seek and face the foe; To fight each sol -dier's read - y. 
Though a last fare-well he take Of home and friends most sad-ly. 
Gun on shoulder,here you'll see An - oth - er gal - lant sol -dier- 



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Edith m. Thomas. Robin's Return, 

By permission of Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

Andante, p 



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II 



Carl Attenhofer . 




1." Rob -in on the tilt - ing bough, Redbreast rover, tell me how 

2. "In a green and pleas-ant land, By a summer Seabreeze fann'd, 

3. " Rob - in rov - er,there, no doubt, Y our best mu-sic you pour'd out ; 

4. " Lit - tie la - dy, on my word, You do wrong a true-heart bird. 




4 



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You the wea- ry time have pass'd Since we saw and heard you last." 
Orange-trees with fruit are bent, — There the weary time I've spent." 
Pip -ing to a stranger's ear, You for-got your lov- ers here." 
Not one dit - ty would I sing 'Mong the leaves or on the wing." 



Make-Believe Town. 



17 



Claudia Tharvin. 

By permission of The Century Co. 

Allegretto. 



Adapted from Gruenberger. 





Oh! Make 
You take 
The old 
What-ev - 



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- Be - lieve Town is a place 
there a broom-stick, and, quick 
rock - ing chair, with - out arms 
er you wish for, it's wait - 

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as 
or 

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flash, 
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Where wond'rous things hap - pen from 
It's transform'd to a charg - er, all 
Can be chang'd to a char - i - ot, 
What - ev - er you dream of, that 



morn- ing till night. 

fire and dash ! 

en - gine, or hack, 
dream will come true ! 




You may go there in 
Or love - ly white 
The plain wood - en 

You can be what you 




V; 



tat - ters, when, lo and be - hold ! 

po - ny with long silk - y mane, 
floor in five min-utes can be 
will, from a king to a clown, 



V- 



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m 



In an 
Side - 
A 
If you 



in - stant you're deck'd out 
sad - die, gilt stir - rups, 
race-course, a cir - cus, 
once gain an en - trance 



y * 

in sil - ver and gold ! 
and blue- rib - bon rein ! 
a des - ert, a sea ! 
to Make-Be- lieve Town. 



The Moon. 



Christina Rossette. 

n ft 




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I've seen a hundred pretty things, And seen a hundred gay, But 



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on - iy think : I peep by night And do not peep by day. 



I* Translated from the French. ^hc Apple Tree. 
Allegretto. 



French Folksong. 



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1. Come, shake the ap - pie tree, 

2. Ap - pies e - nough for all, 

3. Gath - er a good - ly store, 

4. Pleased will dear moth - er be, 


Tra 
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Tra 
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Shake it right mer - ri - ly, Ap 

Grow - ing in branch-es tall, Pat 

Bask - ets full, three or four, Still 

All our ripe fruit to see, Ap 



y- 



■ pies are ripe you see, 

t'ring and pelt - ing fall, 

there'll be ma - ny more, 

- pies we'll have for tea, 




Tra 
Tra 
Tra 
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la 
la 
la 
la 



la 
la 
la 
la 



la, 
la, 
la, 
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Ap - pies are ripe you see. 

Pat - t'ring and pelt - ing fall. 

Still there'll be ma - ny more. 

Ap - pies we'll have for tea. 



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May Time. 



19 



Translated fiom the German* 



Naegeli. 



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1. The sunshine is glowing, The south wind is blowing, Sweet violets are 

2. 0, sweet is our playtime, When comes the glad Maytime,To wander we 



34 



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seen, On the meadow's fresh green,Hear the birds' songs en-trancing See 
love, By the brook in the grove, While the birds sing to - geth - er Thro* 



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but - terflies dancing, We're gladsome as they, When comes the dear May. 
gold- en bright weather, No children could be More hap-py than we. 



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20 



Frederick Manley. 
Allegro. 



Sing a Song of Workshops* 



G. W". Chad wick. 




1. 
2. 

3. 

4. 



Sing a song 



of work ■ 

the mead ■ 

lors on their bench 

a song of work • 



Ploughmen in 
Tai - 

Sing 



shops ! Bus - y men and things ; 

ows, Fur -rowing the soil, 
- es; Stu-dents in their rooms; 

shops ! Bus - y men and boys ; — 



ifMSyM 




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Blacksmiths at the for • 
Na - ture and her show 
Chil-dren at their les - 
San - ta in the North 



ges 
ers 
sons 
land 



-4 

Where the an - vil rings. 
Blessing all their toil. 
; Weavers at their looms. 
Mak-ing Christmas 



ill 




toys. 



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Christina Rossetti. 



Happy Little Alice* 






4 



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Eleanor Smith. 



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1. 

2. 
3. 



Dan-cing 
Play 
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on the hill - tops, Sing-in g in the val - leys, 
ing games with lamb- kins In the flow'ring T val - leys, 
her fa - ther's cot - tage Turned in - to a pal - ace 



r-N 



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Laughing with the 
Oath-' ring pret - ty 
She'd be none the 




ech - oes Mer - ry 


lit 


-tie 


Al 


- ice. 


po - sies,Help-ful 


lit 


- tie 


Al 


- ice. 


hap - pi - er, Hap - py 


lit 


- tie 


Al 


- ice. 



Ring Around A Rosy. 

Translated from the German. 

Allegro. 

-P—^A . &- 



21 



Reinecke, 




1. A ring 

2. So dance 

3. We nev 

Allegro. 



a - round our Eo 
the ti - ny fair 
er saw the pret 



sy sweet We dear - ly 
ies light A - round their 
ty things But lit - tie 




love 
dain 
stools 



to 

ty 

so 



make, 
queen; 
flat; . 



w 

Then gai 

They cir 

We're sure 



ly skip with 

cle left, they 

'twas there in 

N I 




fly - 

cir - 
grass - 



ing feet While 
cle right, Up 
y rings The 



curls 

- on 

tir 



and rib - bons shake, 
the moon - lit green, 
ed fair - ies sat. 



11 



The journey's EncL 



Frederick Maniey. 
Allegretto. 
\ f 



Eugene Loop* 




0- 
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1. Puff, 

2. Puff, 

3. Puff, 

4. Puff, 

5. Puff, 




+ y — + — v- 

puff, puff, puff ! Hear how deep the en-gine's breathing, 
puff, puff, puff! All the night it's been a - speed-ing 
puff, puff, puff ! Thro' the peace- ful for - ests flash - ing, 
puff, puff, puff ! Thro' the nois - y cit - ies dash - ing, 
puff, puff, puff ! Af - ter such great toil and run - ning 



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child that's skipp'd and run Till his 

fi - ery drag - on, o'er Fields and 

aw - ful gi - ant's gun, Mak - ing 

et val - leys deep, Where the 

y's breath would go, As the 

f ' ? ^ 



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breath is 
past - ure 
birds and 
star - lit 
en - gine's 
— N- 






& 



o 



al - most gone, Puff, puff, puff, puff, When the play is done. 

land and moor, Puff, puff, puff, puff, With a clang and roar. 

bun-nies run, Puff, puff, puff, puff, Till their fear is gone. 

ham-lets sleep, Puff, puff, puff, puff, Up the mountains steep. 

go - ing now, Puff, puff, puff, puff, Ver - y deep and slow. 



Marching* 




Trum, trum, All in line with col- 


ors fly - ing, 


Trum, trum, 


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See the soldiers marching come. Trum,trum, trum, trum. No-ble Bob-by 

IS 



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is the captain,trum,trum,trum,trum,Gallant Tommy beats the drum. 



1 






Amelia M. Sontag. 



Dancing Song. 



23 



Rhenish Folksong. 



m 



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1. Whirl - ing and whirl - ing in cir - cles so light, Dancing and 

2. Hand or - gan's mu - sic's as good as a band, Pave-ment is 




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t=t 



skip - ping from morn -ing till night. One, two, three ; one, two, three ; 
smooth where we trip hand in hand. One, two, three ; one, two, three ; 




glide to and fro, One, two, three; one, two,three; sing as we go. 
see how we fly, One, two, three; one, two, three; Pol - ly and I. 



Rebecca B. Foresman. 



The Spider* 



Folksong. 




H=fc=I 



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i 



1. The spi-der in the cor - ner Might teach you how to weave, But 

2. For if a big broom chan-ces To sweep her home a - way, She 




there s a bet - ter les son She teach - es, T be - lieve. 
says, "I'll weave an - oth • er And have it done to - day." 



Christina Rossetti. 



Wrens and Robins* 




here and there, Buiiding,perching,pecking,nutt'ni)K Kv - 'ry - where. 



24 



Time. 
Trie Clock. 



Tick, tock, 



tick, tock, 



tick, tock, tick, tock. 



Every tick, tock is a measure. 

The March. 



Left, right, 



left, right, 



left, right. 



left, right, 

Every left, right is a measure. 

The Locomotive, Just Starting. 

Puff, puff, puff, puff, puff, puff, puff, puff. 

Every four puffs make a measure. 

The Waltz Movement. 



One, two, three, 



one, two, three, 



one, two, three, 



one, two, three. 



Every one, two, three is a measure. 

These ticks, puffs, or counts are called beats. 



Count two-beat measures. 
Count three-beat measures. 
Count four-beat measures. 



1 2 



1 2 



12 3 



12 3 4 



1 2 



12 3 



1 2 



12 3 



12 3 



12 3 4 



12 3 4 



12 3 4 



The first beat of each measure is stronger than the others. This ii 
called accent. 

In music, notes are used instead of figures. 



Whole note. Half note. Quarter note. Eighth note. Sixteenth note. 



j J 

f note. Quarter 
An , 6 , or & may stand for a beat. 



Note: — The children should be required to recognize and count the rhythm (double, 
triple, etc.) of the songs with which they are familiar. They should occasionally com- 
pare the rhythm of the different songs with the illustrations given above. This may be 
accomplished by singing while marching, or while one or more of the pupils are imitating 
the ticking of the clock, the puffing of the locomotive, or by other concrete examples. 

For Rests and Comparative time values see page 110. 



Tune. 



25 



As children in the primary grades are expected to master certain combina- 
tions of numbers, so in music, they should be expected to recognize and sing 
readily from the staff- or by dictation, certain type forms of melody. Each indi- 
vidual pupil should be made to feel that this is his problem in music — a basis of 
knowledge that must be acquired and demonstrated. 

The following melodic types may be found in the preceding songs. They 
should be presented in different keys from the blackboard, or by dictation, and 
should be made a definite part of the child's musical vocabulary. 

The Scale Ascending and Descending* 

(Showing the Tetrachords.) 




^ 



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The Tonic, Subdominant, and Dominant Chords. 




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B 



Other Characteristic Forms. 
2 3 




Note: — The special exercises on pages 68 and 69 suggest a method of closely relat- 
ing the interval drill to the song. 



A PRIMER OF VOCAL MUSIC 



PART II. 



SONGS FOR STUDY AND SIGHT-READING PRACTICE. 



Polly's Piano. 



iM^mm 



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Pret - ty keys, all black and white,Christmas brought for ray de- light: 



3=X 



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m 



lit - tie tunes ou you I play, Tunes that sweet-er grow each day. 

Polly's Piano. 

( Represented by Numbers.) 



3 — 



4 3 — 



Pupils may be required to express melodies through the use of numerals, 
as above. 

Time to Rise* 

Robert Louis Stevenson, 



£ 



m-A-^ti 



td—tntr: 



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-& 



A bir - die with a yel - low bill Hopp'd up-on the win-dow sill ; 






=4=*=t 



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1 



Cocked his shin - ing eye and said,"Ain'tyou'shamed,you sleepy head?" 
(z6) 



Key of G. 

The Scale. 



21 



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&- 



& 



73 



-&- 



-&_ 



& 



2Z 



The key of C has no sharps or flats. Lower Do is on the first line below 
the staff. Upper Do is in the third space. 



r 



A Study* 



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The Raindrops. 






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1 



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Rain- drops small that pat - ter'd down When storm and 



4 



3 



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wind swept out the town, Climb'd up 






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gam in 



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wreaths of white To homes in cloud-land blue and bright. 

Pussy. 



Christina Rossetti. 



Nursery Songs. 



2r 



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Pus-sy has a whis-ker'd face, Pus - sy has such pret- ty ways; 

I 1 i I 



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Dog - gy scam-pers when I call, And has a heart to love us all. 

Bouncing Ball 



II 



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Boun-cing ball, I throw you, catch you, Toss you Righand high-er still; 



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Back a - gaiu you come, my pret- ty, Touch the ground, too, when you will. 



28 



Nursery Rhyme. 

Sluioly. 

A 



Tick, Tock* 




From Children's Songs. 



4 

fast 



1. Tick,tock,tick,tock,clocks are say - ing, Tick,tock,tick,tock, all strike eight ; 

2. Tick,tock,tick,tock,clocks are say - ing, Tick,tock,tick,tock, all strike one ; 

3. Tick,tock,tick,tock, clocks are say - ing, Tick, tock,tick,tock, half-past three ; 




Break-fast o - ver run and frol - ic,Then comes school,and don't be late. 
Scamper off a - gain, dear chil-dren, Les-sons first,then jol - ly fun. 
Now the pleas-ant work-time o - ver, Playtime's come for you and me. 



From the German. 



The Reason Why* 



German. 




#-f«- 




1. Once there 

2. Once a 

3. "Tell me," 
4. "That's my 



was 
lit - 
said 
song 



a lit - tie 

tie crim - son 

the lit - tie 

of thanks for 



fel - 
clo - 
clo - 
man ■ 



low Gai - 
ver Used 
ver, "Why 
y Dai - 



to 
you 



dressed 

hear 

sing 

gifts 



in 

this 

the 

of 



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L ^- 



i S d—* 

gold-en yel-low :Zum,zum,zum,zum,Zum,zum,zum,zum,Was his 

jol - ly ro-ver : Zum,zum,zum,zum,Zum,zum,zum,zum, All day 

same song o-ver: Zum,zum,zum,zum,Zum,zum,zum,zum,Thro' the 

sweetest honey, — Zum,zum,zum,zum,Zum,zum,zum,zum,From the 

A Study. 



72— -& 



msi 



long. 

hours." 

flow'rs." 



Andante 




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Andante. 



Evening. 



4 4 4 



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& 



Ernst Anschuetz. 




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Key of G. 

The Scale. 



29 




& 



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72L 



& 



121 



-&- 



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The Key of G has one sharp. Do is on the second line. 



Musical Phrases* 

2 




Cher - ries on 



Christina Rossetti. 



a bend -ing bough, And Ned to gath-er them. 
Lady Daffadowru 




F^==£ 






E==E=E 




1. Grow-ing in the vale, By the up - lands hill - y! 

2. In a scant green gown, When the Spring blows chil - ly, 



Grow - ing straight and 
La - dy Daf - fa 



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frail, 

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La - dy Daff-down - dil - ly. 
La - dy Daff-down - dil - ly. 



Summer or Winter. 



From Nursery Songs. 




1. I do not know which I love best, Be-cause when Summer's here I 

2. And when some morning I a - wake, The ground is full of snow; And 




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t 



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-e- 



i 



wish that Sum-mer time would last Much Ion - ger than a year, 
then I wish the Win - ter days Would * nev - er, nev - er go. 



30 



Ada I. Vose. 



The Squirrel. 



r~— ft— 



German Folksong* 



'£¥ 



m^£i 



:&- 



m 



1. You may not think the squir - rel Of whom you sometimes sing 

2. But if you go a nut - ting Some chil - ly au-tumn day, 



*3tt=3 



t 



:x 



:e 



m 



Who seems so fond of play - ing E'er works at a - ny - thing. 
You'll find that Mas-ter squir- rel Can work as well as play. 



r-0tt i 




The Mill -Wheel. 

__ ^ 










-!£*$*—£- 


K 


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rm *u r 


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yty H * 


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# 


L ,_J 



Bound and round the mill-wheel's go - ing, Click, click, clack ! 



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A— 



75*" 



St 



Clear and bright the wa - ter's flow - ing, Click, click, clack ! 

=1=1 



A- 



A- 



■zzt 



F*t 



If the wa - ter flows, 

. — pv— 



if the mill - wheel goes 



fe 



v- 



-H- 



P 



You for bread, my dear, will nev - er, nev - er lack. 

The Silk- Worm. 



R. B. F. 



-Lh*-\ — n— 


— t- •-= -:|||, 




9*9 * 9 * 9 

L_,_, « • L J 



=v» 



Here's a bus-y lit -tie spin-ner Working hard to earn her din-ner, 



11 



I am sure she nev-er guesses What becomes of all her dresses. 




-&- 



Key of D* 

The Scale. 



31 



.a. 



& 



.a. 



-&- 



12: 



-&- 



' The key of D has two sharps. Lower Bo is in the first space below 
the staff. Upper Do is on the fourth line. 



A Study* 




P\ — — -#- 

-\ — 1— •— 



i-H 1 


:3= j_ 



^ 






— f 


tfu ps 


4v 
1 


-f\ 

1 


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It 


-f* 


"fv- 


J^_ 


1 


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IV 




r 


^3 


1 


4f 




^ 


_i 


_l 


_p 


--H- 


1 


^r 


IS 


1 


V 


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W 


1 


I 


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1 
I 


4B 


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w 


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4) 


J 




















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& 



An Explanation* 



n 



Charles Hendricks* 
By permission. 

Moderato. 



Hanoverian Folksong* 




1. Boys and girls when days are balm-y Wear their light -est clothes, And 

2. Then when wraps and coats are deal To chil-dren ev - 'ry- where, The 




wrap themselves up warm as squirrels soon as win- ter shows; But 
trees be - gin to shed their leaves and stand quite cold and tare. * 





trees are ver 
May - be ev 

H J J 



y 

' ry 



fun - ny, for 
sum - mer, just 



in warm - est hours 
like me and you, 



-fV 



— \ V 



3 



2 



£ 



11 



They aredress'din man - y leaves and sometimes man - y flow'rs. 
They outgrow their clothes and wait till spring weaves them a - new. 



32 



Oxfordshire Children's Song. 
m lb Allegretto. 



Spring is Coming* 



J. A. Martin. 




fr 



383 



fc-v 






— r 



=£ 



-H— H 



S 



1. Spring is com-ing,springis com - ing,Bird-ies build your nest ; 

2. Spring is com - ing,spring is com - ing,Flow'rsarecom-ing, too ; 

3. Spring is com -ing, spring is com -ing, All a - round is fair; 

ft- -*-r~K IV 




Weave to - geth - er straw and feath- er, Do - ing each your best. 
Pan - sies, lil - ies, daf - fo - dil - lies Now are com -ing through. 
Shim-mer, quiv - er on the riv - er, Joy is ev - 'ry- where. 



Old English. 




London Bridge* 

-J — \~4 



Old Tune. 



~l- 

4 

-#- 



l: 



4 



& 



t- 



-] 



& 



1. Lon - don Bridge is bro - ken down, Dance o- ver, La -dye Lea 

2. Shall we build it up a- gain ? Dance o- ver, La -dye Lea 

3. Gold will all be stole a - way, Dance o - ver, La - dye Lea 

4. Steel will bend and steel will bow, Dance o- ver, La -dye Lea 




Lon - don Bridge is bro - ken down, With a gay La 

Shall we build it up a - gain, With a gay La 

Gold will all be stole a - way, With a gay La 

Steel will bend and steel will bow, With a gay La 



dye. 
dye. 
dye. 
dye. 



5 Wood and clay will wash away, 
Dance over, Ladye Lea ; 
Wood and clay will wash away, 
With a gay Ladye. 



6 Build it up with stone so strong, 
Dance over Ladye Lea ; 
Then 'twill last for ages long, 
With a gay Ladye. 



Lullaby. 




Key of A. 



33 



I 



The Scale* 



The Scale one octave lower. 



2Z 



-<^- 



.C 



-&- 



%—&—&- 



J3L 



-&- 



ZZL ^r^ 



-&' 



&- 



-V-&-&- 



The key of A has three sharps. Do is in the second space. 
I. Studies* 



*tf 




m^u 



:fc=fcc|=l=fc= 



- <g * m y-#- 



=P=n=1=r* 



p 



£=*=* 





4=£=i 



4 



a!=r* 



t= 



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i 



in. 

ft 



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4=F=±=t 



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li 






zt 






t 



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t=F=tt| 



m 



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II 



IV. 



-J 8^4 ! . 1 -I — \ 



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# — r« — r« — ^- 



1 1 i 1— r~ : 



Folksong, 




4 

f-r-r-r-r 



F 



•H« 



* 



# 0- 



?—P 



« 



V. 




^#a— =l=l=q=l — -i— =l 



if-u v n 



German Air. 



J 1 



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i 



u 



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* 




I 



gg^HE ^p 



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4 



10 



34 



Mouse Cousins. 



Christina Rossetti. 




SSEzb 



A-A 



— I 1- 

#— 0— + 




Zft^ 



4- 1 1 



1. The cit-y mouse lives in a house; The garden mouse lives in a bower ;He's 

2. The cit-y mouse eats bread and cheese ;The garden mouse eats what he can ; We 




# — # — ■■ 



friend - ly with the frogs and toads, And sees the pret -ty plants in flower, 
will not grudge him seeds and stalks,Poor lit-tle tim -id fur - ry man. 



Bells in the Steeple* 




-t— t- 



=4 



0—0- 



Bells that hang high in the stee - pie, Call - ing, "Come to 




=t=^=:+ 



:z£ 



& -■ 



church, good people ;"Loudly ring and sing your song,Ding! Dong! Ding! Dong! 



Snowing and Blowing. 

Translated from the German. 




German Folksong. 



4 

-0- 



-4 






i 






fc 



1. The north wind's a blow - ing; But 

2. The March wind he'll blus - ter, His 

3. The north wind's a blow - ing, But 
4 For spite of the snow - ing, Gray 



blow - ing and 

for - ces he'll 

flow - ers are 

pus - sies are 










Ft 



snow -ing, With win tei will pass, Lit - tie 
mus - ter ; But he, too, will pass, Lit - tie 
grow-ing; Dear Spring's at the door, He'll come 
show - ing ; And spite of the wind, Brave blue 



fcri=t 



lad - die and lass, 
lad - die and lass, 
in, now be sure, 
violets we'll find. 



II 



Key of E. 

The Scale. 



35 



Ik ft, 



& 



is: 



& 



is: 



^ 



Z2I 



-«^- 



1SL. 



The key of E has four sharps. Do is on the first line and in the third 
space. 

A Study* 



rSlJEEtztz: 



&—0 









fH 



#-*-# 



-<S>- 



=ttt 



■J-Jl-J. 






A Melody. 



1_ 



Wilfielm. 



=t==* 



• — ^ 



3EES33=33 



* * «g 



*A 



P^^ 



t?i/* cres. 



»— b^ — - 



4 



•d— *- 



-*--<» 



-^ 1 4 — a — m— 



*• 






F=t=t 



-f — # 



F=t 



-• — 4- 



* 



The Snowbirds* 



u 



B. J. Reismann. 



pfa 



4_q — 1 — } 
— -• — • — • 



-j- 



1 



fc 



* — ± 



J j =±: 



Ma - ny dear snowbirds come trooping a - long, Mak - ing the 



r-o-y. 



!-ff, 



*% S=M 



*— *— d 



rr-1 J 1 J fa 



*— * 



i^— -# — ^ 



m 



111 



air full of twit - ter - ing song. They flut - ter and twin-kle a 



site 



-# — # — ^ 



:=*=fc^= 



#- 
t 



4 



S3 



m 



bout in the trees. And let us come tow'rd them as near as we please. 



36 



Signs of Rain. 



Dr. Janness. 







4 



2 



=t 



German Folksong. 



#- 



=t 



1. The hoi - low winds be 

2. Loud quack the ducks, the 

3. The wind un - stead - y 



gin to blow, The 

sea - fowl cry, The 

veers a - round, Or 

dolce. 



dim. 




4 



3 



+ 



— i- 



A— 



__i — 



clouds look black, the 
dis - tant hills are 
set - tling in the 



glass is low, Last night the sun went 
look - ing nigh, The smoke from chimneys 
east is found ; In fi - 'ry red the 




n ; j. ii 



pale to bed, The moon in ha - los hid her head. 

right as - cends, Then spread - ing, back to earth it bends. 

sun doth rise, Then wades thro' clouds to mount the skies. 



Mother Goose. 
Allegro, f 



Pussy-Cat, Pussy-Cat. 



J. W. Elliott 




fe=2 



=* 



itb 



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A-#' 



Pus - sy - cat, pus - sy - cat,where have you been ? I've been to Lou-don to 



A-r- 



S3 



/TN 



-t— A — Ps — fv 

-p — I 1 



4 



— I- 




vis - it the Queen. Pus - sy - cat, pus - sy - cat, what did you there ? 

ores. f 



P-h h 



V" 






t=t 



1 



N- 



-- 1- 



EE2 



-f-f- 



II 



I fright - en'd a 



lit 



tie mouse un - der her chair. 



Allegro, p 



A Song. 



Key of F, 

The Scale. 



37 



fr 



121 



-&- 



~ISL 



& 



'Z2L 



-&- 



72 



-&- 



The key of F has one flat. Bo is in the first space. 



I. 



Studies, 




-N-Nr-^ 



] IN K - 



JV-N 



r-fv 



N~N 



:*=££=; 



Ah 



rft 



±jt± 



tH 



tfe—w- 



v- 



-#+« — \-A 

-F — l-H- 



L^- 



g 



c/oZce. 



German Air. 



3&a=t=t 



4=2 



3=fc 



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4 



# 



3=J 



# — i«- 



t)= 



: f=E 



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P 




# — #- 



*q 



in. 



Andante. 



*3 



8—2 



-p — *- 






S 






■v- 



-h-- 



:1= 



SB 



Folksong. 



-I 



fc±4 



-? — 



p— .•- 



v- 






+- 



v- 






rV 



-f 



-4 



-N- 



-H- 



II 



Gabriel Setoun. The Rain, 

By permission of John Lane & Co. 

N N K- 



t: 



fe£= 



tfe 



A- 



G. Jaspersen. 



£ 



So 



soft 



and gen - tie 



falls 



the 



rain You 




9 



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* 



-H- 



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at 



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can - not hear it on the pane ; For if 



it 



came in 



£ 



f- 



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-H- 



S3 



z£ 



pelt - ing show'rs,'Twould hurt the bud-ding leaves and flow'rs. 



isli 



38 



Prisoners. 



F. M. 







#-•- 



f 



-I — 



v- 






F-#- 



-fc^- 1 - 



— I — I 1-- 

-•-* — *- 



1. The chimney smoke that blown about, A la - cy film of lav - eu-der, Is 

2. And would-n't you be glad to soar, If you had been a pris-on-er For 

3. And so I'm al -ways glad to see The co - sy fire- light flicker- ing ; It 



i 



fa 



i— H 



* 






t=* 









n 



ver - y glad to scam - per out And fly a- way in - to the air. 
man-y mil -lion years or more Where night is al - ways ev - *ry - where? 
sets so man -y pris-'ners free, And lets them go a frol - ick - ing! 



Christina Rossetti. 




**=£ 



-4 



-H- 



Mix a Pan-cake, 



—ft — \ — IV 
- # — ^ — it: 



H 



N — h 



fcfc 



-+ 



Childhood Days. 






Mix a pan - cake, Stir a pan- cake,Drop it in the pan; 



— I 


^ 


-ft- 

— i— 




& 

^ 


-ft 

— 1 — 




-f* 


r-ft- 
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-ft- 

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w 




* 









-* 


— i — 
-#— 


— p 
* 


-ft 

— I — 


-*— 


• 



Try the pan- cake.,Toss the pan-cake,Catch it if you can. 



Studies* 




Key of B Flat. 



39 



The Scale, 



t 



The Scale an octave higher. 



•72T -&- 



~~&- 



-&- 



~ZZL 



-&- 



J2L 



-& — \-& 



-&1 



-&■ 



Z2L 



The Key of B flat has two flats. Do is in the second space below and on 
the third line. 



A Study. 



g§^S&2 









it 



— [Sh — N 



*+t 






-A —i — IN 
g ■ i i 



IB 



Fox and Goose. 



b 



: R 



4 



— N-+ 



t 






•H 



v — \ — v — n — Pv — jt — i k — i- 

p — p — p — p — i f\-# 1 1- 

d d d 4 -*-±- -•— 7* 



German Melody* 

-i P\- 



2=£ 



fv- 



H — 



i 



■&. 






—\ P 



H- H |- FN I- F 



dL 



— * — # — # 



Allegro. 

% 

A~d 



— I — - — i 1- P 1- 

# ^ S — i 



--+ 



•4 — j. — * — i 



PI 

■20- 



A Song. 




lOjpi^— *r 



German Folksong. 



$ 



-v— i 



± 



j — *- 





•* ~ '! # # ! -, i* P « 


r/r\V 9 ~ m m 


L 1 • L h *~ H U y 1 

^ 1 / 1/ L^ £ £ p 1 



k=a 



d~dt 



£ 



/ 



_p\_ — ^. 



H 1 



-F 



Jz — ^-iV 



^-zfcfafc 



— i 



— H — 



tF==*=^ 




40 



The Young Jasons. 



Frederick Manley. 
Moderato. 



Brandenburg Folksong. 




P 



—\- 



-H— 



1. Fair winds blow 

2. Tom 's com - mand 

3. He - roes dash - 

4. Sail - ors fear - 

5. Home 



0- 



fe^i 



=t 



$=+ 

ing ; 'Tis time that we were go - ing 
■ er, And o'er the pond he sends her 
ing, Thro' the surf we're splash-ing, 
less, We search a treas-ure peer - less, 

ro's cour-age burn - ing — 




On our ves - sel stout and fleet ; Hoist the flag and loose the sheet. 

Tow'rd the treas-ure-land that lies Out of sight of mother's eyes. 

Scar - ing all the geese and ducks By the fierceness of our looks. 

Sis - ter's lamb a - meng the trees, For it bears the gold-en fleece. 

Pull the old barn-door a - shore, Soon we'll walk its deck once more. 




Moderato dolce. 



A Melody. 



German Air. 



Key of E Flat. 

The Scale. 



41 




-&- 



zz 



-&- 



-&- 



i 



& 



zz 



& 



zz 



The key of E flat has three flats. Do is on the first line and in the fourth 
space. 

A Study, 




The Body-Guard* 




1. When the streets are grow - ing dim, To my camp I go ; 

2. Four large can-non guard the door, Cav - al - ry the bed ; 

3. Ev - er wake - ful, brave,and wise, He - roes, ev - 'ry one, 












& 





There my sol-diers,bright and trim, Wait me in a row. 
In - fan - try up - on the floor Watch till night is sped. 
All the day they guard my toys, Till my school is done. 



Three Plum Buns. 



Christina Rossetti. 




--1 



Ft 



i-N- 



— i- 



£j=d2 



i 



f=k 



Three plum buns 



t 



£ 



at 



to 



-+ 



-+ 



eat here at the stile 

r-N , !V 



£ 



— i- 



: H- 



■# 



i 



X — 



-& 



In the clo - ver mead - ow, For we have walked a mile. 




3 



tF= 

One for you and one for me And one left 

i— N- 



4 







ver; 




N f 



m 



Give it to the boy who shouts To scare sheep from the clo - ver. 



42 



Daisies. 



Christina Rossetti. 




fete 



?zf?z 



&: 









r 



-i — h# 



=i 



— |- 



-P- 






M 



a--, 



H 



Where in - no-centjbright-ey'd dai - sies are,With blades of grass be 




*-*-#— t- 



£=£ 



— f- 




1-w- 



t= 






tween,Eacb dai-sy stands up like a star Out of a sky so green. 



II 



The Mournful Linnets. 



Christina Rossetti. 

fcfcjix=r=£ztf: 






5ES 



--rV- 



j — i m. 



¥-M- 






Children's Songs. 

rn — A 



— I — ^ — i p,_ 



* — ^ 



1. Hearwhat tlie mournful linnets say :" We built our nest compact and warm, But 

2. "They crush'd the eggs so neat-ly laid, So now we sit with droop-ing wing, A nd 




-i 






X- 



-#- 
-f— 



-V 



— i- 



X- 



— i- 
1- 



mm 



cru - el boys came round our way And took our sum - mer house by storm, 
watch the ru - in they have made, Too late to build, too sad to sing." 



I. 




Ste 



:fc 



5$: 



Studies. 



-- 1- 



— j j 1 1 



N * 



-f 



-4 



N — i 



-F 




— N 



— i- 



— |- 



ii 



ii. 



5—2— ft- JL_ d 









H 



S 



pt=:*= 



f : 



* 
tc 



Ft5 



S 



Key of A Flat. 

The Scale, 



43 




fr 



M 



yr^z&i 



& 



_£2. 



-&- 



zz: 



& 



jO.. 



-&- 



The key of A flat has four flats. Do is in the second space. 



zfctarzz 



P- 



A Study. 



4= i 



tt=t= 



pz=t=FP=P=5 



* 



E£ 



+-- 



k^r^-»— •— *~F' 






F=W 



sti 






R=t 



zpzat 



-F— F — 



I 1 



B 



Songs. 



i. 






:t=4: 



German, 

-j 
— i 



i — | 



l=3 



=fc=t 



#—•—#- 



=r= 



-*— — #— #■ 



1= 



t—?—0 



F4 



fc^=^=== 

?-J^=1 

^-*f--J 



-* — 0- 



# _ 



t=4=± 



:<5*- 



*EEF 



r=r=^ 



t±=£= 



-^ 



£=F 



f=t= 



r^ = rfc^70=4 



00= j l_| f^ 






#-*-»- 



W=£ 



4 



ifl 



II. 



Seidel. 




&£3%=f= 



^fe_=ag 



:t 



± 



^ 



=f== 






^ 



t= 



mf 

g-£-U4- 



tt=f 



==1=fr==4 






E=j= rf*=*£ Ml 




Christmas Bells* 




• .i i g ? ■ 



Hark! I hear tlie bells are ring-ing,Mer-ry Christ-mas to us bring-ing. 
li P , , PP r* 



'-m^ 1 ^ 



4 



-<$>- 



<s> 



i 



-& 



& 



\-&- 



-&- 



m 



Bim, bom, bim, bom, bim, bom, bell. Bim, bom, bell. 

A Study* 




p4 


h K h [> 


i 


h"h 




nMr- 


i — ; 




! II 


M ~% . , m 


-J r* 


1 1 i 

1 _l A 


I # 






IS 


II 


ft 


T>^ -' #» - 


• 1 




r 


w i n 


3t=* 


1 n 


J-H 


L ^- — 


k- 




- \r^ 


— ? « 



James Slocum. 

By permission. 



Little Pilgrims* 



F. H. Arkwright. 




1. When the 

2. Lit - tie 

3. Bach a lit ■ tie 

4. Flow'r-less dales and 



farms with fruits and clo - ver Ev - ? ry - where are 
ships with lit - tie treas - ures Un - der - neath their 
pil - grim bear- kig; For the flow -ers, 
bar - ren pla - ces, Where the lit - tie 




scent - ed sweet, Lit - tie ships come sail - ing o - ver Field and 

shin - ing sails, Bound for pla - ces bare of pleas-ures, Borne on 

ev - 'ry one, Send their seed - ling chil - dren far - ing, Just as 

pil - grims grow, Soon are filled with man - y gra -ces ;Woods where 




4 



4 



77— 

wood and vil - lage street; Silk - en ships, a count-less fleet. 

breez-es, tossed by gales, Sail -ing on to flow'r-less dales. 

soon as they are grown In - to coun - tries of their own. 

bands of song-sters go, Flow'rs whose sweets the wild bees know. 



B 



The Wind. 



45 



Traditional* 




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1. When the wind is in the East, It's nei - ther good for 

2. When the wind is in the West, The corn and clo - ver 
8. When the jol - ly North wind blows, It brings the cold and 
4. When the gen -tie South wind blows, The flow'rs their pet - als 




man nor beast, It's nei-ther good for man nor 

grow the best, The corn and clo - ver grow the 

drift-ing snows, It brings the cold and drift - ing 

all un-close, The flow'rs their pet - als all 



un 



beast, 
best, 
snows, 
close. 



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James Slocum, by per. 



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A Dream* 



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1. A dream's a ver - y fun - ny thing; He hides be-neath the bed, 

2. He has a mag-ic pic -ture lamp He lights with -in onr brain, 

3. A.nd oth - er things not quite so good He shows us when we lie 




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And just as soon as we're a - sleep He steals in - to our head. 
And man - y things we've quite for -got He shows to us a - gain. 
On Christmas night when we have had Too much of Christmas pie. 



II 



46 



From Nursery Rhymes* 







Jumping Johnny. 

( An interval study.) 



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Jumping Johnny,Blitheand bon- ny,Hopsand skips the livelong day ; 



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Tom and Ben-ny, Sue and Jen-ny, Join the jol- ly jump-ing play. 



From "Little Folks." 



Gentleness. 




1. Lit - tie children, nev - er give Pain to those that feel and live ; 

2. Nev - er hurt the tim - id hare Peep-ing from his gras- sy lair ; 



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the gen- tie rob - in come For the crumbs you save at home- 
her come and sport and play On the lawn at close of day. 



II 



In May* 



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1. In May I 

2. It cheers the 

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go a - walk - ing To hear the lin - net 
heart to hear them, To see the leaves un - 



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sing ; The blackbird and the thros- tie A- prais-ing God their King, 
fold ; The meadows scattered o - ver With but- ter-cups of gold. 



John B. Tabb. 



Frog-Making. 



By permission of Small, Maynard <fe Co., Boston 

:fe—--*- 



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1. Said Frog Pa - pa to Frog Mamma,"Wbere is our lit - tie daugh-ter?" Said 

2. Then down the anx-ious fa-ther went, And there in-deed lie found her A- 



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Frog Mam-ma to Frog Pa - pa, "She's un - der-neath the wa - ter." 
tick -ling tad -poles till they kicked Their tails off all a - round her. 



The King of France. 



47 



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The King of France and all bis men March'd 



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up the hill and then march'd down a - gain. 



From St. Nicholas, by permission 
of The Century Company. 



A Sleigh Ride. 



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The Robin and the Redbreast. 



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1 . The rob- in and the redbreast, The rob - in and the wren, dear, If 

2. The rob- in and the redbreast, The mar- tin and the swal - low, If 



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e'er you take them from their nest, You'll nev-er thrive a - gain, dear. 
e'er you rob their pret - ty nest, Bad luck will sure - ly fol - low. 



48 



The Fairies' Dance. 



Old English. 

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By the moon we sport and play, With the night be-gins our day ; 



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As we frisk the dew doth fall; Trip it, lit - tie ur- chins all, 



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Two by two, and three by three, All a -bout, a -bout go we. 

Harvest Time* 



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Lydia Avery CoonIey« 
Allegretto. 



Indian Summer. 



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wild; Then crad-les in a peace divine Her Indian summer child. 



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Songs. 



49 



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Left ! Right ! 



From Action Songs* 



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Left! right! left! right! marching free; Sol - dier's life's the life for me. 

January and February* 



Christina Rossetti. 



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drip-ping wet ; March wind ran - ges, A - pril chan - ges. 



50 



Frederick Manley. 

Lightly. 



The Happy Eskimo. 



Eleanor Smith. 




4 



1. The hap-py lit - tie Es - ki - mo, He rides up - on a 

2. My sled is i - die in the hall ; The ground is bare of 

3. Jack Frost is with him all the year, And makes him lots of 




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sled ; His dogs out- strip the winds that blow A-cross the gleaming 
snow ; The night comes ear-ly in the Fall, And when I hear my 
snow, And i - cy hillsides smooth and clear, To coast and slide on 




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ice and snow, Beneath the northern lights that show Like sil-ver o - ver-head. 
ma-ma call, I have to say good-night to all, And to my bedroom go. 
without fear-0 how I wish Jack Frost were here, And I an Es- ki - mo ! 



Tr . by Helen Goodrich. 

Andante. 



Stars and Dewdrops. 



51 



Witthauer. 



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1. Round us falls the qui - et night, Star on star be -gins to peep; 

2. All the bush-es and the trees, Little blades of grass, and flow'rs, 

3. Now they shine with jewels bright,Sparkling like the stars on high, 



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From above come dew-drops bright, While the sunbeams are a-sleep. 
Wave their gladness in the breeze All the bu - sy day-time hours. 
But when comes the morning light Stars and dewdrops say good-bye. 

A Round. 
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52 



The Divided Beat. 



James Slocum, by permission. 

Allegretto. 



Sleighing Song. 



Old Tune. 




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1. Ting- a - ling - a - ling, The bells are ring - ing,Ting - a - ling - a - 

2. Ting- a- ling- a - ling, Past mead-ows ly - ing,Ting - a - ling- a - 

3. Ting- a- ling -a - ling, When folks are sleep -ing,Ting- a - ling- a - 




a 
A 



ling, A sil ■ ver song; Ting-a - ling- a - ling, Like swal - lows 
ling, Like moon - lit pearls; Ting-a - ling- a- ling, The sleigh is 
ling, For girls and boys ; Ting-a - ling - a - ling, A sleigh is 



N — 




II 



fly - 
sweep 



ing, Ting-a - ling- a -ling, We dart and glide a - long. 
ing, Ting-a - ling -a - ling, With hap - py boys and girls, 
ing, Ting-a - ling - a - ling, With Avondrous Christmas joys. 



The Elephant. 




1. The el - e - phant's a trav - el - ler from far a - cross the 

2. And so he has a room-y trunk to take where e'er he 




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seas ; TTe 
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travels round with cir-cus-es and big men -ag~ er - ies. 



gets so man-y pres-entsfor the fun -ny tricks he does. 
French. Adapted by E. S. The Ponies* French. 




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1. In Co-logne so they say, All the po - nies small are grey. 

2. In Ro-chelle,queer old town, Po - nies great and small are brown. 

3. In Ber-lin, strang-est sight! Al-most ev - 'ry po - ny's white- 

4. Browmor bay, black or roan, Were the po - ny dear my own! 

5. He and I then should roam Thro' the great world far from home- 



The Divided Beat in Four-Four Time* 



53 



i. 

From St. Nicholas by permission. 



Five Little Girls. 



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Five lit-tle girls with hearts so light, Five lit-tle bowls with milk so white ; 

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Five lit-tle girls with an ap - pe - tite, Five lit-tle bowls all emp - ty quite. 



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Scarlatti. 




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The Divided Beat in Three-Four Time. 



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54 



Songs* 



Fr. Seidel. 




II. 



Silesian Folksong. 



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Earths Dresses* 





The earth was dress'd in brown last night; 

-N — i N P 1 K s ;: 



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This morn 



ing, 



see! 'Tis dress'd in white. 




The Bugle Call* 

(A Study in 1, 3, 5, 8.) 



Old German. 



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1. The 

2. The 



bu - gles that sound at 
bu - gles are call - ing 



the break 
at eve 



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day, Say, " Up, dear coin - rades, and march a - way.' 
gray, " Now sleep, tired sol - dier," is what they say. 



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The Butterfly. 



55 



Jennie M. Youngs. 
Allegretto, p 

f\ — Sr 



Erwin Oehme. 




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-I 

1. But - ter - fly, flit- ting by, Have you an - y work to do? 

2. Yes, in -deed, o'er each seed I must shake the pol -len box. 

3. Then, you know, I must sew Bach-elor's but-tons in a row. 

4. Brown-eyed Sue needs me, too, La - dy's slip - per I must tie. 




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II 



While you flit, I must sit, Read-ing les - sons thro' and thro'. 
Maid-en's hair needs my care, I must wind the Four - o'-clocks. 

I must look in the brook, For the dew-drop pearls be - low. 
Nev - er say, e'en in play, I - die is the but - ter - fly. 



On a Snowy Day* 



Translated from the German. 
Moderato. 




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Old German. 


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1. Fall ing, 

2. Squir - rels 



fall 
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Fast 
From 



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snow- flakes 
hoi - low 



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fall 

trees, 

room. 



3. Fire - light play - ing Through the 

4. Thoughts of wan - d'ring Through the wind and snows, 



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On the 

Sa - ble 

Makes our 

Makes our 



house- tops, 
- coat - ed, 
books and 
bed so 



on 
safe 
toys 
nice 



the seas, 
from harm, 
and things 
and warm, 



On the ponds and 

Feel the snug - ger 

Dear - er when the 

When the chil - ly 




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all the trees, Whirl - ing, whirl - ing Round the rteep-le tall, 
for the storm Sweep- ing,sweep - ing O - ver lonesome leas, 
cold wind sings, Stray- ing, stray - ing Out there in the gloom, 
sad-voiced storm,Moaning,moan - ing Past the chim-ney goes, 



56 



Songs* 



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Moderate*. 



Graben-Hoffman. 
After an old Folksong. 



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Father Christmas. 



57 



Tr. from the German. 




Folksong. 



-ft— N — fr 






1. Father Christmas, Father Christmas Stridis across the frozen moor; 

2. Father Christmas,Father Christmas, He's a hale and heart- y one; 

3. Father Chris tmas, Father Christmas, Comes a-like to rich and poor; 




Father Christmas, Father Christmas Knocks at ev - 'ry waitingdoor; 
Frosty beard and bro ws they hide not Sparkling eyes that flash with fun, 
Youngandold he loves and bless-es, Pain and sor - row he can cure; 




O - pen wide and give him room,Joy and glad-ness with him come. 
Though his years are man -i- fold, Still his heart's a heart of gold. 
Praise him for his good-ly cheer,Mak-ing bright the clos-ing year. 



The Hurdy Gurdy Man. 



From Songs of Childhood. 



Carl Wilhelm. 





Out in 

Gay as 
When school is 



— V— 

the 

a 




— - 



sun-shine,free as the breez - es, Play - ing sweet 
gip - sy ev - 'ry- where straying, Welcome as 
o - ver, riltrav-el yon-der,'Way in the 



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mu - sic wher - ev - er he goes ; Mak - ing his mon - key 

Christ-mas in vil - lage and town; Loved for his mon- key, 

land where the trick mon-keys play ; Then thro' the world with 




act,when he pleas-es, All the fine tricks that the fun-ny man knows, 
loved for his play-ing, Get-ting more pennies than we'll ev- er own. 
mu - sic I'll wan-der, Watching my mon-key do tricks ev-'ry day. 



58 



Gray Rain. 



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P-Ps : 



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1 . Gray raiu,cold rain, how came you here ? Grieving clouds dropped many a tear. 

2. Cold rain, gray rain, what will you do ? Wash your world and make it all new. 



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Old Rhyme. 

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Lady-Bird* 



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French Melody. 



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1. La - dy -bird, with wings all speckled, Come to me and rest, my dear; 

2. La -dy -bird, now swift -ly fly Thro' wood and glen, o'er bush and fern; 



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Come and rest for I'll not harm you, Show your wings and nev - er fear. 
See ! your house a - fire and blaz - ing ! All your chil - dren dear will burn. 



Bees are Humming. 



59 



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Bees are liiim-ming,Summer'scomiug,Sun-warmed fields are green and bright; 



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Gay brown rov - er, fly - ing o - ver, Seeks the clo - ver, red and white. 



Two Part Studies* 



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Jane Taylor. 




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Ev- 'ry morn and ev - 'ry night,Fresh and sweet and pure and white. 



60 



The Humming Bird. 



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1. The humming bird that flash - es by Like jewelled lights of 

2. How good are all the sweets that lie In ev - 'ry gar - den 




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morn-ing sky, Is say -ing gen-tly as he goes,lium,lium,lnira,lnim,liuni,huin. 
flower that blows, And in the heart of ev - 'ry rose,hum,huin,huin,huin,l]um,huin. 



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1. Pink eyed Bun - ny, long- eared Bun-ny, Nev-er tastes my 

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breadand hon-ey; Fun-ny Bun-ny he, takesno milk or tea. 
seed and car - rot ; Crooked beak-ed Poll has no teeth at all. 



Studies in Two Parts* 



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62 



Good News. 



Anna M. Pratt. 



From the " Youth's Companion." 
By per of the publishers and the author. 



G. Jaspersen, 



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1. I've heard a pleas-ant piece of news For chil-dren that are good : 

2. With tap'ring stems that seek the sky,That grow so tall and straight, 

3. In - deed, the green pro-ces - sion is Al- read - y marching down 




*±£ 



A mil - lion love - ly Christ-mas trees Are wait-ing in the wood. 
And boughs adorn'd with clust'ring cones,The fir trees stand and wait. 
From for - ests on the mountain to The chil-dren in the town. 






A Study. 



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The Months. 



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Children's Songs, by permission. 



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Thir-tydays hath Sep- tem-ber, A -pril, June, and No-vem-ber; 





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All the rest have thir-ty -one SaveFeb-ru - a - ry, She a -lone Hath 



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eight days and a score, Till leap year gives her one day more. 



The Streamlet. 



63 



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1. Streamlet flowing,clearly showing All your bed of peb- bles brown, 

2. Off you hur-ry in a flur- ry Thro' the meadow, to ward the town. 

Two Part Studies* 






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A Two Part Study* 



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64 







"Wackernagel* 

n Allegretto, mf 



A-Riding. 



Nicolau 




1. When Har - ry goes a - 

2. But qui - et sis - ter 



rid - ing,His 
Nan-cy The 

A- 



po - ny gray be - strid-ing, 
po - ny ne'er would fan - cy ; 




Old Rov- er fol - lows, White dust whirls and tan-gled fly long 
The yel - low coach that stead - y rolls, Bears Nan - cy dear and 




gold - en curls. Jog, jog, jog, jog, jog, Go, po - ny, boy, and dog. 
all her dolls; On the carriage bowls With Nan-cy and her dolls. 



Robin's Rain Song. 



Celia Thaxter. 

By permission of Houghton, Mifflin <& Co. 




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1. O Rob- 

2. Four days 

3. How nice 

4. But since 



in, pipe no more of rain,'Tis four days since we saw the 
a - go the sky was clear; But when my moth-er heard you 

to be a bird like you, And let the rain come patt'ring 
I can -not be a bird,SweetRob-in, pipe no more of 




sun; And still the mist -y win-do w pane Is filled with drops that leap and run. 
call, She said," That's Robin's rainsong,dear ; O well he knows when rain will fall." 
down; Nor mind a bit to be wet thro',Nor fear to spoil one's on - ly gown! 
rain; Do tell us of the sun-shine,dear,I'm wild to be a - broad a - gain. 



German Folksong* 



Ten O'clock* 



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1. Hear the bell strike the hour High and clear from the tower. 

2. Ten o' - clock, tir - ed folks Go to sleep, say the clocks. 



Two Part Study* 



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Early Spring* 



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Ere the ear - ly blue-bird dares With the north wind cold to wrestle, 



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Broth-er Gray coat Chicka - dee braves the storm with cheery whis-tle. 



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66 



A Friend in Need* 



Frederick Manley. 



Carl WilHelm. 




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1. Once up - on a time 

2. Then a ba - by ant 

3. Thro' the woods of grass, 

4. One by one the birds 



In a sum-mer wood, 
Stole a - way to play 
By the flow - 'ry coast, 
Hushed their cheer - y songs, 








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Bus - y bands of ants were working Star - ing win - ter food. 
Tho' her wis - er lit - tie sis - ters Cautioned her to stay. 
Round wee lakes of dew she wandered Un - til she was lost. 
Sunbeams danced a - way, and sha-dows Came in pur - pie throngs. 




5. Just as darkness made 

All the woodlands drear, 
Thro' the trees a golden lantern 
Twinkled bright and clear. 

6- 'Twas a fire-fly bright, 
Like a star he shone ; ' 
In the grass he saw the wand'rer 
Crying all alone. 



7. " Come, dear baby ant, 

I will go before ; 
Pierce the darkness with my lantern 
Bring you to your door." 

8. Safe he led her home 

Thro' the grassy wood. 
" Thank yon," said the ant, " hereafter 
I'll be very good." 



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Song to Venus. 



67 






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1. star, that climbs the west- ern sky At twi-light ev-'ry day, . 

2. I've heard your skies are al -ways blue And each day lasts a year. . 



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Wheu dol - lie goes to sleep and I Must put my toys a - way ; . 
how I wish I lived on you In-stead of liv - ing here. . 



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Special Studies* 



Designed for drill on the intervals of the songs for which they are 
written. 



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Good-Morning." 






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"Make Believe Town." 



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"The Clock." 



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The Trees." 



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Soldier Song/ 



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69 



i. 



The Apple Tree/ 



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Bogieman." 






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The Snow Bird's Message/' 



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Pussy Cat, Pussy Cat.' 




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A Melody* 



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A PRIMER OF VOCAL MUSIC. 



PART III. 



SONGS FOR IMITATIVE SINGING. 






TTri nstated from the German, 

Vivace. 



The Bogieman. 



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1. A wee, brown, wrin - kled bo - gie-man lives here with - in our 

2. The wee, brown, wrin -kled bo - gie-man goes dan-cing thro' our 

Vivace. 



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house, my dear, A wee, brown, wrin - kled bo - gie - man, of 
house, my dear, A jol - ly, jol - ly fel - low he, who 



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The Bogieman. 

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71 



my 
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whom we have no fear. Up - on his back he bears a sack Of 
brings us all good cheer. He capers,springs,and laughs, and sings, His 



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sweets and toys a might - y pack ; And lit - tie chil - dren 
burst-ing pack a - bout he flings ; And chil - dren 's sor - rows 



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nev • er lack When bo - gie - man is near, 

lose their stings When bo - gie - man is near. 







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72 



Frederick Manley. 



Joyful Days* 



Whelm, 




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ver, and winds of sum - mer blow 



1. When tlie win - ter's 

2. Stur - dy lit - tie la - dies are blush -ing red and 

3. Laugh - ing wa - ters dan - cing a - long the raoun-tain 



white: 
ways, 




In the sunlight glan-cing, The meadow folk are dan-cing, And gold -en head-ed 
While in woodland pla-ces Are tender az - ure fa-cesThat see the trees a- 
"Ev -'ry-where are say-iug,'The time is come for play-ing, lit - tie people 




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maids are nodding in a row. 
bove a-twink-ling with delight, 
all, en-joy the hoi -i - days. 




Rebecca B. Foresman. 

Moderaio. 




that large head and those big eyes ; But still, I'm sure, you 
wis - dom, tell me whence it came ; He looked at me as 




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A thing but say " To- whit, to-whoo." 
he knew, But sim-ply said " To-whit, to-whoo." 




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74 



Christina Rossetti. 
Allegretto. 



Work and Play* 



Carl "Wilnelm. 




V 



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1. A pock- et-hand-ker-chief to hem, Oh! dear, Oh! dear, Oh! 

2. But set a stitch and then a stitch, And stitch and stitch a - 

-HS-H ^ Kr- 




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dear ! For man - y stitch - es it will take Un - til it's done, I fear, 
way, Till stitch by stitch the hem is done; And af - ter work is play. 



Rebecca B. Foresman. 
Allegretto. 




The Morning Glory* 



G. W* Chadwick* 



=i=t 



-N- 



1. Dear Morn - ing 

2. Why don't you 

3. "I love to 

4. "By noon I 

5. "But ev en 
Allegretto. 



Glo 

take 

gaze 

can 

if 



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a 

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on 
look 
eyes 



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the 
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Sun," 

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shut, 



You 

Each 

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I'm 




must get up 
morn - ing, tell 
Morn - ing -Glo 
face has grown 
not a - sleep, 



too 
me 

ry 

so 
Oh! 



soon, . 
pray? . 
said; . 
bright ; 
no; . . 



Or you could stay quite 

You do not know how 

"And when I know that 

And then I close my 
I know I have a 




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The Morning Glory. 



75 




wide 
nice 
he 
eyes 
drow 



a - wake 
it is 
is up, 
and try 
sy look, 



Un - til 
To be 
I can 
To make 

But I 



the af 

a - wake 
not stay 

be - lieve 
can see 



ter 

all 

in 

it's 

to 



noon. . 
day. . 
bed. 
night, 
grow." 




Topsy-Turvy. 



Frederick Manley. 
Moderato. 



John Martin* 




1. A - cross thepur-pling hill- tops and be-yond the sun -set 

2. The world is top - sy - tur- vy, and those fun - ny chil-dren 




-^— * 



skies, The lit - tie chil- dren of Ja - pan are just a -bout to 
go With fields and hills a- bove them and theheav -ens down be - 



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rise; While here my mam- ma tucks me in and kiss - es me good 
low. I'm sure they'd all fall off the earth,but then, as you can 



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night,Their almond eyes are op -'ning wide in morning's golden light, 
see, Their silk- en pig-tails hold them up like monkeys on a tree. 



76 



Gabriel Setoun. 



Morning Song* 



By permission of John Lane Co., New York and London. 

Lively. 



Old English Play Song. 



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brush 

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girls 


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Make them bright,both left and right, This is the way we 

Leave no speck on cheek or neck, This is the way we 

jTrom the crown we shade it down, This is the way we 

Chil - dren must be - ware of dust, This is the way we 

Who'd be seen both neat and clean, This is the way that 

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brush 
wash 
comb 
brush 
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our boots To 
our face To 
our hair To 
our clothes To 



go 
go 
go 
go 



and girls Pre - pare 



to school in the 

to school in the 

to school in the 

to school in the 

for school in the 



morn 
morn 
morn 
morn 
morn 



ing. 
ing. 
ing. 

ing. 
ing. 




Morning Song* 

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The birds 
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have had their bath, 

that looked so black 

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face of ev - 

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sail - ing now 

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all 
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flow'r is clean, And chil - dren al - so 
twig and bough And chirp - ing, tell all 
snow - y white, And boys and girls should 
run and play, And so be - gin a 

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78 



A Child's Evensong. 



Andante, p 



J. Stainer. 




1. Fiom 

2. Boun 



the heav'n a - bove us, 
teous-ly He gives us 



'Mid the an - gels mild, 
Food andrai-ment still, 




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Looks a lov - ing Fa - ther Down on ev - 'ry child. 
Gra - cious - ly He keeps us From each threat-'ning ill. 



v- 



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Ten - der - ly ±ie 
Praise the lov - ing 



^ "-= *— hs> — 

lis - tens When He hears us pray, 
Fa - ther, Of His good - ness tell ; 




Faith - ful - ly He guides 
He will not for - sake 



us 
us, 



On 
He 



our earth - ly way. 
doth love us well. 



Open the Gates as High as the Sky* 



From " Songs for Kindergarten and Primary Schools," 
by permission of Oliver Ditson Co. 

With animation. 







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1. O - pen the gates as high as the sky, And 

2. The gates were o - pened high as the sky, But 
Chorus. Tra, la, la, etc. 




im 



let - King George and his men pass by! O - pen the gates as 
nev - er the king or his men pass'd by !The gates were o - pen'd 

D.C. 



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high as the sky, And let King George and his men pass by ! 
high as the sky, But never the king or his men pass'd by! 



Allegretto. 



The Goldfinch. 



79 



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Folksong, arranged by J. Brahms* 




1. Sweet-est 

2. Gold -en 

3. Pois-ing 

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of 
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so 



mu - sic 
plum- age 
light o'er 
N 



you 

as 

the 



oft have heard, "When on a 
yel - low light ; Black vel - vet 
this - tie flow'rs, Gold bird, o'er 



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late sum-mer day You may have spied a dear jew-eled bird 

sleeves doth he wear, Black is the cap o'er his eyes so bright, 
pur - pie bloom gay, Make the fields glad thro' the sum-mer hours 



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Poised on a this-tle's light spray. 
This-tle seed dainty his fare. 
Good Nature taught them the way. 



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Laura E. Richards. 

By permission of Little, brown & Co. 

m Allegretto. 



Jacky Frost. 



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Eleanor Smith, 

A— A^A— \ 



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1 . Jacky Frost, Jacky Frost Came in the night, Left the meadows that he cross'd 

2. Jacky Frost,Jacky Frost Crept round the house Sly as a sil-ver fox, 





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All gleaming white; Painted with his sil-ver brush Ev - 'ry win- dow 
Still as a mouse. Out our lit -tie Jen-ny came, Blushing like a 




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pane ; Kiss'd the leaves and made them blush, Blush and blush a - gain, 
rose, Up jump'd Jack-y Frost,Andpinch'dherlit - tie nose. 



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Moderato. 



The Swallow. 



81 




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2. It 
3.'Tin 

4. "I 

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li - lacs all are 
is my friend the 

glad e - nough to 
al-ways wear dark 

tak - en sum-mer 

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Folksong. 



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bloom-ing, 

swal - low, 

get here 

col - ors ; 

lodg - ings 

__J _J_ 

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The cher - ry-flow'rs are 
As sure as I'm a- 
I on - ly came to- 
I'm ev - er on the 
Be - neath your cot-tage 

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white ; I hear a sound be - low me, A twit-ter of de-light. 

live ! I'm ver-y glad to see you ! Pray,when did you ar-rive ? 

day; I was this ver - y morn-ing A hundred miles a-way !" 
wing : A so-ber suit for trav-'ling For me's the prop-er thing, 
eaves. You'll hear each night and morning, My twit-ter thro' the leaves." 




My Cap. 



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"Take off your hat and hang it up," To - day the teach-er 




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said : "But don't take off your 'thinking cap', Just leave that on your head." 



82 



The Woodpecker. 



Frederick Manley. 
Not too slow. 



Ethelbert Nevin. 



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1. There's someone tap-ping on the ma - pie tree, Tap ti - py tap, tap, 

someone com -ing down tne ma- pie tree, Tap ti-pytap, tap, 

someone go - ing to the ma - pie tree, Tap ti - py tap, tap, 

canlando. 



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tap ; 
tap; 
tap; 



But there's no one a -bout as I can see, Save a 

And he's hop-ping a - bout so bus - i - ly, In a 
He's as gay as a prince or a lord, but he Has-n't 



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The Woodpecker. 



83 



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lark that is sing- ing a song of glee On a sun - lit bough,and it 

cap quite as red as a bar-ber - ry, And a coat as green as a 

time to go round showing off,you see, For he stays in the woods working 



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Joyfully 




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is - n't he That is tap - ping a - way so stead - i 

sum - mer lea, And he's sing - ing a laugh- ing mel - o dy, 

lov - ing - ly At a snug lit -tie home for his fam - i - ly, 





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y tap, tap, tap. 

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^4 Frederick Manley. 

ji Allegretto. 



The Air Ship. 



French Folksong. 




— 



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2. 



- ver the 

Soar-ing to ■ 
Sometimes to 
Man-v a 



sun - flow'r tops and 
ward the clouds our 
take a dar - ing 
game I know and 



gar - den rows And 

air - ship goes, Then 

pass - en - ger We 

lots of plays For 

— Fs- 





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lawns and hedg - es wing 

down a - gain we're swing 

rest a - bove the clov 

boys the wide world ov 



ing, Light as the 

ing, Fear - less and 

er, Then once a - 

er; Oh, but it's 




fuz - zy seeds the west wind blows When nights are growing long : 
brave be-cause our Captain knows The orchard boughs are strong. 

swing. 

4 



gain we're mounting thro' the air Like swal-lows on the 
best to go on sum-mer days A - sail - ing in a 



Frank Dempster Sherman. A DCW prop. 

By permission of Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

11 p Grazioso^ 

\ — N * — 



85 

W. V* Gilchrist 



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1. Lit - tie drop of dew 

2. When the day is bright 

Grazioso. 



Like a gem you are; 
On the grass you lie ; 



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I be-lieve that you Must have been a star 

Tell me, then, at night Are you in the 



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Allegretto. 



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Rain Song. 

-A— 



:n 



Eleanor Smith. 



--rV 

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1. Eain, rain, 

2. Eain, rain, 

3. Rain, rain, 



do not go, Rain, rain, we 
do not go, Rain, rain, we 
do not go, Rain, rain, we 



love you so ! 
love you so ! 
love you so ! 



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Make us mu-sic on the pane, Drum to wild wind's fid-die-strain, 
Make the brooklet's wa-ter high, Then our tall boots we may try : 
If you're warm and soft and mild Then each strong and healthy child 



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Make us pools where-in to float Ev - 'ry lit - tie paint-ed boat. 

Wash the grim - y cit - y clean, Make the lawns and meadows green. 

Wa-ter-proofed,be-rub-bered too, Forth shall go to play with you. 




- 



Tf . from the German of Grotfa. 



October. 



f . K. G* Loewe* 



87 




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Birch - es 
Stur - dy 
By the 
Cun - ning 



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m 

now are yel - low turn - ing, Su - mac 
oaks are chang-ing slow - ly Green for 
road - side pur - pie splen - dor ; Troops of 
art - ist, dear Oc - to - ber, Well we 



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now 
robes 
as - 
love 



are grow - ing red, Ma - pie wears a glo - ry 

of pur - pie brown, Wood-bine flames and milk- weed 

ters ev - 'ry - where ; Sis - ter Gold - en - rod her 

thy col - ors fair, Mak - ing all the wood-land 





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ing Crim - son round 

ly, E'er their dry 

der Weight of gold 

ber Glow in gar 



her grace- ful head, 

leaves rus - tie down. 

a - gain doth bear, 

ments rich and rare. 



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88 



The Firemen* 



Frederick Manley. 

With vigor and quite fast 



Ethelbert Nevin. 





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1. Ding dong ! Ding dong ! 

2. Ding dong!Clang cling! 

3. Ding dong ! Dong dong ! 

4. Ding, ding, ding, dong ! 




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Too-too - ta - too • ta - too ! Bring the hois - es from their stall ; 

Too-too - ta - too - ta-too! Bring the ax - es and the hose ; 

Too-too - ta - too - ta -too! Steer your hors - es round the chairs 

Too-too - ta - too - ta-too! Now the fire is out, my men ; 




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The Firemen* 




V 

Make a - way, you peo - pie all, For 
Get your rain - y weath - er clothes, See, 
Gal -lop down the hall and stairs; Get 

kLet us gal - lop home a - gain ; Blow 



our steeds to speed a - long, 
the fire is flick - er - ing. 
your lad - ders tall and strong 
the whis- tle,sound the gong. 

t 




Ding 
Ding, 
Dong 
Dong. 






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90 The Blacksmith. 

Translated from the German 

by E. S. m f 



L. Gruenbcfgef. 



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1 . Brawn- y blacksmith, big and strong,Blow your bellows 

2. Brawn- y blacksmith, big and strong, When you sing your 



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sing your song. When the i - ron, glow-ing, Ro - sy-red is 
hap - py song,Does the day grow bright-er? Does the work seem 



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show-ing, Make your cheerful an - vil ring, All your stout blows 
light -er? Jol - ly blacksmith, tell me true, Are all blacksmiths 



The Blacksmith. 

— a poco _______ _ _ — __ al f 



91 



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an - swer-ing, Gay your ham -mer swing-ing To yourjol-ly 
glad like you, When the ham-mer swing-ing Starts the an - vil 



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sing-ing. There with- in your smithy's shade, Firelight stran-gest 
ring- ing ? Blacksmith,laughing,shakes his head, "Many a grum - bier 




forms has made, Shapes that go a - dan - cing, O'er the ceil - ing 
earns his bread." Bread that's won so grudg-ingly, Bit - ter must the 



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The Blacksmith. 



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pran-cing. Here a big - ger blacksmith lives, Blows on gi - ant 
crust be ; Sweet the bread that's earned with joy, Choose the work you 



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love, my boy, Toil with glad en - deav - or, Sing-ing, sing-ing 



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The Month ot May, 



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Words from "Youth's Companion/ 

By permission. 

Andante. 



Eleanor Smith* 



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Ap-ple blossoms pink and white, Rob-in's nest just out of sight, 
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Best of concerts ev-'ry day, That's the dar-ling month, that's May. 




94 



The Rider on the Rocking-Horse. 



From the German, by Helen Goodrich. 
Allegretto. 



Taubert. 





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1. Sir Bi - der, now straight mount your po - ny of gray, And 

2. In Nurn-berg the best of all play-things are made ; Bring 

3. From Par - is a dol - ly for ba - by you'll bring, Wool 

4. Your steed grows im - pa - tient, so off and a - way; Yet, 

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off on your jour - ney ride swift - ly a - way, And pret - ty things, 
ba - by a doll-house, a rake, and a spade ; Then fide off to 
dogs that will jump, sil - ver birds that will sing ; A fur coat in 
stop, one last word in your ear I would say ; Be sure not to 



The Rider on the Rocking-Horse. 



95 



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mind you, wher-ev - er you see, Just buy them and bring them to 
Leip-sic where books you will find ; Bring some with bright pictures, they're 
Lon-don pack up for Pa- pa; In Brus-sels, the pret - ti-est 

loi - ter but fly like the lark, That here you may be with your 

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Bring some with bright pic - tures, they're 

In Brus - sels, the pret - ti - est 
That here you may be with your 





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96 When the Little Children Sleep, 

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When the lit- tie chil-dren sleep Lit - tie stars are wak-ing, 

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an - gels watch do keep. 




Laura. E. Richards. What the Robin SingS. 

By permission of Little, Brown & Co. 
Allegretto. 

A — N-r 



Eleanor Smith* 



!*-*- 




1. Wake! wake !children,wake! Here we're sing-ing foryour sake;Chirrup!chirrup! 

2. Rise! rise! chil-dren,rise! Shake the pop-pies from your eyes ; Sweet! sweet! 

3. Song and sweetness,dawn and dew All are wait-iug now for you; Wake! wake! 




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chirrup !chee! Sweet the song as sweet can be, Sweet the song as sweet can be 
chirrup! tweet! Morning blossomsat yourfeet,Morning blossoms at your feet, 
children, wake! Now we're singing for your sake,Now we're singing for your sake 

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98 



Gabriel Setoan. 



A Mystery. 



By permission of John Lane <fe Co., New York and London. 



K. G. Hering. 



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1. Flow'rs from clods of clay and mud ; Flow'rs so bright and 

2. Do you wash your-selves at night, In a bath of 

3. God, per - haps, sends sum - mer show'rs, When the grass grows 




grass so green ; Tell me, blade, and leaf, and bud, 
dia - mond dew, That you look so fresh and bright 
gray for rain, To wash the fa - ces of His flow'rs, And 



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How it is you keep so clean, How it is you keep so clean. 
When the morning dawns on you ? When the morn - ing dawns on you ? 
bid the fields grow green again, And bid the fields grow green a - gain. 




Translated from the German. 
Andante. 



Morning Prayer* 



99 



Rheinberger. 




1. Fa - ther dear, I fain would thank Thee For my long 1 , re-fresh-ing 

2. All that I to - day am do - ing, Help me, Lord, to do for 

Andante. _____ ______ "T" 

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sleep, And the watch that Thou didst keep, While I slumber'd soft and 
Thee, May I kind and help - ful be, On - ly good in oth-ers 



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deep,0'er Thy child so lov - ing - ly, So lov - ing - ly. 

see, Try to serve Thee faith-ful - ly, Serve Thee faith - ful - ly. 




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The Ring. 



Ry per. of The Thomas Charles Co. 

Allegretto. 



Arranged from J. "W» Elliott 




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2. Only the salvia turns about. 

On-ly the blue-bell turns a-bout. 3. Only the jonquil turns about. 

4. Only the violet turns about. 

5. Only the marigold turns about. 

6. Only the clover-leaf turns about. 

7. Not one of us goes in or out, 
But the whole circle turns about. 



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By per. of The Century Co. 

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When the Stars. 



JOJ 



Dr. Garrett 




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1. AV hen the stars at set of sun Tvvin-kle in the sky, Then the 

2. Then, whenmorning light appears And the bright sun gleams, Babes and 
> J* , k , P PP lento. 




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little babes at rest Dream that mother's by, Dream that mother's by. 
birds and flowers, too, Wake from sweetest dreams, Wake from sweetest dreams. 



Margaret Sangster. 

By permission of Harper <fe Brothers 

Andante, p 



The Little Trolls are Spinning* 



Eleanor Smith. 





1. The lit- tie trolls are spin - ning The cro-cus garments gay, 

2. Be -neath the great oak's foot,dears, And. by the fro - zen stream, 

3. For oh! the trolls are bus - y When win-try breez-es blow, 

Andante. imimihii — m 



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Cups of hon - ey, col - ors sun - ny,To see the light one day. 
On her pil - low, Pus - sy - Wil - low Is wak - ing from a dream. 
AVeaving flow'rs for sum-mer hours Deep down be -neath the snow. 




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102 



Rebecca B. Foresman. 

m Allegretto, p 



Asleep and Awake, 



S. Reid Spencer. 







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1. Moth- er Earth is sound a-sleep; Who, oh ! who will wake her? 

2. Motli-er Earthis wide a- wake; "Who will bring her flow - ers ? 




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will," said the mild south wind, "I will gen- tly shake her." 
will," said the beam-ing sun,"Help'd by A - pril show - ers/* 

The Wind 

W\ W*. Gilchrist. 
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Robert Louis Stevenson. 



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1. I saw you toss the kites on high, And blow the birds a 

2. I saw the different things you did,But always you your- 

3. you that are so strong and cold, blow-er,areyou 




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bout the sky ; And all a-round I heard you pass Like la-dies skirts a - 
self you hid. I felt you push, I heard you call, I could not see your- 
young or old? Are you a beast of field and tree, Or just a stronger 



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cross the grass. O 

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wind ! 
wind! 
wind ! 



wind ! 
wind ! 
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O wind 
O wind 
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Christmas Time* 



Walter Stanhope- 
By permission. 

With spirit. 

fcif£-fi-»— ' 



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It's best for skates and sleds 

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sea - sons, Old Christ-mas is the best for cheer And ma - ny oth - er 
play - ing. The summer's good for hoi - i -days, For boat-ing,ball, and 
jol - ly ; And then it's just as nice in - side For sis - ter's brand new 




FOEE 




rea-sons ; For let - ters that the post -man takes To San - ta with our 

hay - ing. The fall's a time most beau - ti - ful For hock- ey and Thanks 

dol - ly. What oth - er time makes bed a joy, And stockings so de - 










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wish-es ; And his re - ply of books and skates, And toys and dainty dishes. 

giv-ing;But Christmas time's the time when we Are glad that we are living. 

light-ful.And ev-'ry lit - tie girl and boy So hap-py and so spriteful ? 




Frederick Manley. 
Moderato. 



A Child's Thanksgiving. 



John Martin. 




praise, 
raise, 

cheer ; 
dew. 






For the freedom they have bro't us, And Thanksgiving hoi - 1 
For the pumpkins, nuts,and ap-ples Sent to grace the hoi - i - 
Let us all be glad Thanksgiving Comes for us in ev-'ry 
For the joys Ile'sev - er send-ing Ev-'ry year to me and 

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days. 

days. 

year. 

you. 




106 



The Christmas Tree. 



R. Spenee Watson. 

> 7/5 Grazioso. 



Mylcs Birket Foster. 




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2. Bright and light our Christmas Tree, Hail old Fa-ther Christmas ! 



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Old and young to - geth -ersay. Hail old Fa - ther Christmas ! 
Bright and light our hearts must be, Hail old Fa - ther Christmas ! 

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Bright the co-lored ta- pers shine, Hail old Fa - ther Christmas ! 
Dance.then, children, dance and sing, Hail old Fa - ther Christmas ! 



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Bright to-day the love di-vine, Hail, old Fa - ther Christmas ! 
All the mer - ry cho - rus ring, Hail, old Fa - ther Christmas ! 

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Helen Goodrich. 



A Prayer. 



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1. Dear Lord in heav'n, Thou guardest me Thro' all the bus-y day, 

2. Thou wilt be near me all my life And lead me faith-ful - ly ; 

3. Dear Lord,who all the long night thro' Dost watch us as we sleep, 




And send-est bless-ed sleep at night And keep-est me al - way. 
Oh, help me thank Thee as I ought For all Thou giv - est me. 
Oh, teach us Thy dear will to do And all Thy laws to keep. 



108 



Andante. 



The Guardian Angel. 

Folksong, arranged by J. Brahms, 



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1. My guar-dian an - gel, pure and bright, God's face for- 

2. When day de - parts and night is near, Thy light in 

n Andante. 



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path a - right, While I have breath and be - ing. 
deeds to fear, My heart to good in - clin-ing. 

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My Country, 'Tis of Thee! 



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1. My coun-try, 'tis 

2. My na-tive court 

3. Let mu - sic swell 

4. Our fa- triers' God, 
Moderate. 



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of thee, Sweet land of 
try, thee, Land of the 
the breeze, And ring from 

to Thee, Au - thor of 



lib - er - ty, 

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all the trees, 

lib - er - ty, 




Of thee I sing . Land where my fa - thers died, Land of the 
Thy name I love; I love thy rocks and rills, Thy woods and 
Sweet freedom's song ; Let mor-tal tongues a -wake, Let all that 
To Thee we sing . Long may our land be bright With freedom's 

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pilgrim's pride ; From ev - 'ry mountain side Let free-dom ring . 
tern - pl'd hills ; My heart with rap-ture thrills Like that a - bove. 
breathe partake, Let rocks their si-lence break, The sound pro-long, 
ho - ly light, Pro - tect us by Thy might, Great God,our King. 






no 



Dancing Song, 



Folk Song. 



Allegretto. ™f 


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1. In the meadow's bright green Starry flow-ers are seen, And the 

2. Hear ! The gay birdlings' band, As we fly hand in hand, To our 




warm A - pril sun- shine glows bright - ly. On the shad-ow - y 
dance lends har-mo - ni - ous meas - ure; And the breeze, as it 




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lea 'Neath the blossoming tree Let us skip it and trip it so 
goes, On our reddened cheeks blows, And the grasshoppers join in our 





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Andante. 

HZ 



Now the Day is Over. 



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1. Now the day is o - ver, Night is draw-ing nigh, 

2. Now the darkness gath - ers, Stars be - gin to peep ; 



8. When the morn-ing wak - ens Then may I 



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Shad-ows of the ev - 'ning Steal a - cross the sky. 

Birds, and beasts, and flow - ers Soon will be a - sleep. 

Pure, and fresh, and sin - less In Thy ho - ly eyes. 



A PRIMER OF VOCAL MUSIC. 

PART IV. 

STUDIES IN TIME AND TUNE. A DRILL SUPPLEMENT. 



INTRODUCTION. 

Studies in Time and Tune form a Practice Supplement to Part II of 
this reader, and are intended to afford material for still more exact and 
educative drill. 

Whatever the problem of the exercise to be taken tip, it is understood 
that the child is not to approach it from his own initiative, but only after 
similar technical elements have been experienced in a song. Thus the 
studies in rhythms of two-four measure should be preceded by a song in 
like measure ; the studies in scale progressions or chord intervals by a song 
in which such scale progressions or chord intervals occur. In short, all 
the practice, while becoming more and more exact, is nevertheless never to 
cut adrift from the purely musical enjoyment of songs. Moreover, the 
drill in notation will be greatly advanced and made vastly more thorough 
if the melodies, after having been sung from the notes, and having served 
their purpose in sight reading, are learned by heart, sung musically, and 
then written down again in the original staff positions, or in others as 
required by the teacher. This is not the same thing as requiring "trans- 
position" at this stage; the child merely takes his scale upon any position 
of the staff designated by the teacher. The object is to educate the eye 
to measure staff intervals and to associate staff forms with musical pro- 
gressions which have been made by practice entirely clear and distinct 
in the mind of the pupil. 



\\2 



Studies in Time and Tune. 

An illustration of two-four time. 



Tick, tock, 



tick, tock, 



tick, tock, 



Hick, tock, 



Each tick, tock is a measure. 
Each measure should be counted as follows : 



One, two, 



one, two, 



one, two, 



one, two. 



m 



Sf- ± 



The Scale in Quarter Notes. 

J — Zl f — — I# 

— i 9 — # — i m — # _ 



■atzzz x: -1—31 =i=#=: *=Z= 

^*— ^ — — - L -H — 1 — - 1 - x 



Tt 



1. 



E£& 



Studies. 

Introducing the two-pulse tone. 



I| 1 I 



«=# 



§i 



3- 



^: 



:n: 



E^=± 



_ j_ 






=t 



:*=5 



E±EH±= ± 



:i=V 



EH 



a 




II. 



:^=rd=::. 



l::_ ::^_ 



' #"#• 



:±: 



•gr W' 



9~W~ 



& 



TJr 



:=tzt 



■#-#- 



in. 

IV. 



^ u B ii 



~J ! h 



_E 






=F 



:*=# 



;s 



r=i 



PI! 




IteTZtdZEt 



13=^-* 



tf— jr 



: — # 



"~r 



#— g- 



Two-two Time. 



dzzt 

-# — #- 






:xz±::n 
az=fz±«iz*z±^: 






— 1 — 1 h 



L <s>- 



-<^- 



5S 



j— i 



fat* 



:j — l 



VI. 



"^-^ 



1! 



II 



I 1" 



2^ 



: <g-^ : 



d=± 



- g'-g- 









Studies in Time and Tune. 



113 



Three-four time* 



The Triple Movement. 



One, two, three, 



one, two, three, 



one, two, three, 



one, two, three. 



Each one, two, three, is a measure. 

Studies. 

Introducing the three-pulse tone. 
I. 



immm mm mMmmmi 



ii. 



m 



fa 



^ 



-j i 



--m^E^E* 



# -#-^ 



T±z:t:q: 



■1 — ± 



=1=1 



-d J n: 



:±=: 



#—^-5- 



^] 



III. 



3 ! ' « -h-i-^-fffl 1 

— r; ■ ■ 1 » — # — 



e^t*T^* r 



id 



«-* 



r-|—r- 1— * -* 






IV. 






fcztzEiIiz, 



X— U. 



.Ti-Zj 



iLiN 






4-H 44 fl 



i=4^ 



v. 



4 I i t 



.#_#. 



r 



t±=tt 



F=±=M= 



*r 



75" 



™r 






rt=4=t 



_pE=:: 



ill 



VI. 



dh±3fzr±z±rti== 



f -L j Q+T 






VII- 



ssi 



CT=t±=ti: 



±±ti± 






rjrqzqzi 



■H — P-J-=l-4 



=t=fc 



3T. _ # 



fc 



l? ~» j # 



— r~ 



j. 



:i 



1 I 1 



0—0—0- : —d — i_: :._, — H 



114 



Studies in Time and Tune* 

An illustration of four-four time. 
The Locomotive Just Starting. 



puff, puff, puff, puff, 



puff, puff, puff, puff, 



Each four puffs make a measure. 

Each measure should be counted as follows : 



1, 2, 3, 4, 



p*» 



-T K v ** — * — * — * — • — * 
ccp A # w i i i — h 



1, 2, 3, 4, 
Studies. 

Introducing the four-pulse tone. 

F 



etc. 



F=t±f 



t 



t=t 



^H 



II. 



ft 1 I : 



^ #- 



t 



_# m. 



R=± 



j — g — j — # 



■&- 



I 



III. 



pfci 



U 



Ar-0 9 9 



3F=J 



P-— *- 



tzzfc 



-# — #- 



f + 



T 



-»- 



IV. 



•¥+ 



pt 



=t= 



JL 



±=± 



i 



t 



# — *- 



-0 — #- 



-fi?- 



V. 




-& — 



4 *- 



* — « — y 



3?— £ 



t= 



dzizl 



c±=t 



9 



t=~- 



# # 



'# #' 



zezi: 



-# — #- 



— c^- 



VI. 



r* 



-it- 



.-'. 



.J. 



-*Mt-*-*-r-* 



IS. 



m r m 



-*-r-t-~ri~ 



-&— 



=Ft 



-^J- 



rz=t 



ct±s 



2 , 



IS 



VII. 

fal 



ii 



F=f=t 



T^ 



•&L 



-&- 



r— si 



£ 



l5>- 



zz 



-^~ 



-(£>- 



321 



t=t 



<s> 



a 



Studies in Time and Tunc 

In different rhythms. 



115 



I. 

n ft 










1 




" y r*y i 


i 






1 i 






JL * i 1 


i i 


H ^— 


i 


M 9 


# « 


-<^ — hz? — 


(m) A * — * — 


* 9 


J • 


-<s> — 




1 


CX _J 



g 



-0 9- 



.0 0. 

i 1 I 



-» #- 



tz=_t 



« — # 



:^- 



-«$?- 



ii 



u 



4-*— y 



"j: 



l==±=q=: 



c± 



i 



t=t 



™t 



=J=:d 



L 



=f 



— 1" 



:lt 



=t 



t- 



-« — # 



a 



in. 



±i 






=±± 



te 






+-H- - ; - -J— ts>— - 

#-•-#-- L*- - 1 - J- 



mffm^ffi 






ci:±±:=±: 



— f- 



n^zszyn 



~&- 



in 



IV. 



a_~u: f #. 






:j: 



'9 9 9~ 



^=::=q=q=i: 



* — * 



;i^=^=j 



razz 



i=± 



:d— =j 



-^ 



ill 



v. 




tif-l— ^ 



-_L 



H- 



-w-*- 



S 



r: 



±rd=d=c 



t '= 



:£=3=i 



r: 



'ZZ. 



11 



116 



Studies in Time and Tune. 

The relative length of tones. 

la-la | la-la | la-la | la-a | la-la | la-la | la-la | la-a 
The one-pulse tone contrasted \vith the two pulse tone. 



£S 



-A 



:s>~ 



:q=d: 



-(2. 



tt 



t=F 



h 



75*" 



~i — r 



Yjzl 



ii 



Z^s! — 



:&~ 



:d: 



Coming Rain. 



-<s?- 



« — #- 

fc= 



TT 



^iil 



Sun's a - way, Skies are grey, Eain will sure - ly come to - day. 



Playing Horse. 



=*#=* 



:d 












i 


, 


r> 


<? 


m m, 


. .. 










V 


# J 


_.-! _.-■ 




— I 


1- 




V 


«J O 



Up the hill we're run - ning, Now we scam - per down ; 



$=t 



:n 



-~i 



~.3~C 



.&. 



tt 



r 









F=P 



H r 



^— hgr- gi 



li 



e; 



We're the fast - est po - nies In this whole hig town. 

A Study. 

::± 



3E 



J. 



zt 

■«5?- 



:::-i::d::q 



± 



- i I 1 -4- 

. . / ^_. ' L ■_ 






r — r— r -- 1 r- - 

— I m ' 1 — "TT- ~ 



1&1X 






—^- & 




Pussy Cat. 






G 



zt 



d=: 



— <s> — 



75 



~4 



-& 



Pus - sy cat, pus - sy cat, Where have you been? 



m 



-i 



-&- 



-&- 



T" 



I Y 



P 



=t 



~&- 



:1 






Yt^—Y 



li 



I've been to Lon - don to vis - it the Queen. 



Studies in Time and Tune* 

The relative length of tones. 

la-la-la | la-la-la | la-la-la | la-a-a 
The one-pulse tone, the two-pulse tone, and the three-pulse tone. 



\M 



i. 



HW 



'4 \}j\}j}\^ fcM 

A-r*- 3 -^*— — F g — r -FF-r 



H: 



X 



* * . 



txx— 



Pi^=p 



■W~m M~M — 



II. 



:te££ 



"2? 



' l_ 



ppt=b=±^cti 






-<5>—m — 



m 



c±±x 



t 



2Z 



II 



in. 



^F^-H-H-F^-Lar-F 



- w 4 I i * r *-»-*- F* — j-FF— |- 



F±t± 

0-0-0 



TT1- 

0-0-0- 



b±±± 
0-0-0 



72* 



II 



In the Barnyard. 



Christina Rossetti* 



«B 



:qz=: 



nz™ 



ri — r 



-<$>- 



-(22. 

4= 



=P==t 



Pink-y white pig - ling Squeals thro' his snout; Wool- ly white 



£==? 



<^ 



Zt 



(2 



±=t= 



p=f : 



T" 



t=r 



lamb - km Frisks all a - bout; Cluck,cluck the nurs-ing hen 



fc 



=t 



d: 



I 



=!=£: 



h-M— ? 



-t 



3=± 



» — »- 1-z^ 



II 



Summons her folk; Ducklings all down-y soft, Yel-low as yolk. 

A Little Dance. 



.f- 






SZZ7D 



<^^ 



^=4 









75 



zifetz^ 



jzz: i£2^_- :: J : :^2_-_. 



j=d: 



4 



--fi?-*- 






:±::: 



:fcz2: 



n 



118 



Studies in Time and Tunc. 

The relative length of tones. 

la-la-la-la | la- a- a- a | la-la-la-la | la-a-a-a 
The one-pulse tone contrasted with the four-pulse tone. 



Lullaby. 



^ 



:±=t 



tt 



:zz 



zr 



—r 



r=r: 



t=± 



I — r 



n 



# — # 



^ 



'» r 



^1 



Autumn Days. 



i— 



^4UM=Z3rzZ«=S 



tz 



d 



& T& 



Leaves are fall - ing brown and sere, Days are short - er grow- ing ; 



qzzzq: 



~t 



t 



-&- 






-&- 



il 



Soon the win-ter will be here, Loud his trumpet blow - ing. 

Evening Prayer. 



*4 



A-i 



:z 



yj- 



-&- 



-& 






1 1 I J 



-6 & 



!& 



Now the world is sleep - ing, Lit - tie stars are peep - ing ; 



=« 



1 



— r 



d: 



tzr 



Z£ 



-<s>- 



-h- 



~j: 



=t 



r ~^~ 



ii 



Fa - ther, in Thy keep - ing May the chil - dren rest. 

Marching. 






=t=F 



iqzzqzzq: 



r±=t=t 



=t 



=t 



t 



:5 



5 






I 1 1 l3L 



■i — h 

• — i- 



a=p: 



q: 



_L 



II 



Studies in Time and Tune. U9 

The two-pulse tone and the three-pulse tone contrasted in different rhythms* 

A Bugle Call. 



I- 



i 



:±zc 



■± 



-&- 



z± 



-&- 



-&— 



._!- 



_J 



± 



=t 



s- 



:-± 



n 



-<5>- 



=t 



Zt 



=f 



4 



-<5>- 



I] 



"» •" 



Gathering Posies. 



=£ 



d 



tEzsizz*: 

4 * h 



z£ 



— i- 



-<5— 



c:i 



■3^- 



-<S>- 









=t=t 



ii 



<5> * & • 



=t 



-G>- 



^— d: 



F=# : 



-<s> — ■— 



::±z=:± 



S— -<s> 



A Study. 



% 



4= I | l 1 ^^=t 



t 



-<S> — #- 



C TJ-fr j==±Ft^— t±=\ 



-&- 



t 



tt=t 



-^#1* ^Tfe 



•> 



£ 



P 



r u_ 



3-s> — .-FS^* 



t=W 



tp 



-^ #- 



^^Ef^pz 



c±=fc 

<5> # 



=f= 



tfczt 



2=V 



d=t 



t 



il 



-<S>— 



Evening Prayer. 



:! 



— -2^—^ #- 



3 1 1 r±=±:::±z±: 



-& — #— 



cs: 



-s?- 



-g? — y 



3 



"/»? — y 



i. 



_^j. 



Folksong. 



±=±rd=±x 



-<$> — #- 



-^ — #- 



zfcdz 



pgs^rsrzd: 



t: 



:p=f=: F 



-S»- 



±=J 



-& ■— 



a 



t=fc 



120 



Studies in Time and Tune. 

Beginning with the last pulse of the measure. 
Two- four time. 

la | la-la | la-la | la-la | la 

Four-four time. 

la | la-la-la-la | la-la-la-la | la-la-la-la | la-la-la 

Three-four time. 

la | la-la-la | la-la-la | la-la-la | la-la 

Studies. 
A Scale Song. 



4E±Ed=2 



+ * 



■9— * 



3 



* # 



n=T=P 



■m — - — - — Tt-T 



a 



We pull our sled up hill and then We soon are speeding down again. 






Morning Songf. 



Old German, 



-9- 



1 t 



* 0- 



— T 



t=f:=J 



E 



-j 



-j- 



1-1— 

-m 6 



:± 



75?" 



m\ 



4-*- 



The Weaver. 



# 1 # 



d=±=t 



-# — #- 



.(2 *. 



II ,1 



BE 



J 



S 



^ 



i=p 



j2. 



r: 



F=t=3 



-£/" 



f 



=T 



-^ * -; — * 



=1 



rr 



c:d=d: 



■^ 



-^ — #- 



±P± 



-^-h?— *-]-&- >-■ 



±z 



-& #- 



■x 



_ - ^ g 



•g* »~ 



IB 



Studies in Time and Tune. 

The Divided Beat, 

la-la-la-a | la-la-la-a | la-la-la-a | la-la-la-a 
Each, measure should be counted: 

1&2 | 1 & 2 | 1 & 2 | 1 & 2 



m 



The Scale. 

(Illustrating the Divided Beat.) 



fcfe* 



fe% 






N=3 



— &- 



-0- 



:fc=zi=t±£ 



v 



'&3r-Z=r. 



£=£=! t=± 



— p '— 



— \- 



JL 



t: 



II 



f=fe±5 



\- 






— !V 



^t?-*- 



-w- 



F 






i — v- 



A— -V 



i=?=m\ 



Allegretto. 



A Melody. 



W. A. Mozart 





fto is 


\ 


m 


A 





m 


» 




-fc 


— N- 


; 


■n^ n 


1 1 


W 


V 


I ' 


m 


m 


« 


m 


1 


V 


P 4 * 


>s 


1 / 


I j 


U 


•j 






, 


w 


w 


# 


m 


/jl 


V 


ST 1 


^ 




-!/- 


1/ 


V 


V 






V 



Si 



-* — is— #- 

■i 1 — h- 



-9- 

-r— 



v — y- 



9. 

4e 











i £ 




^ s i 


cresc. 








rs is 


— -g 


i ** M M 






m 


m 






IT 1 1 


W \ ' m 


m 


& & 


W 
1 ■ 


w 


9 


9 


9 9, 






9 9 9 


i ii i i 




y !/ 1/ \j 


j 




y 


V 


J 


\J 






„mf 


w 




r 


w — 




J # fv n, - 


^ 


9 9 m 








W 


9 


_M 


m 


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III 




\ ) tf M 1 J 




'^ 'w 1 






W 


w 


9 9 m \\ 




1/ • • w* 


W 




V- 


-V- 


—y— 


1 


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J 22 Studies in Time and Tune. 

Studies. 
Note. — The rhythm and tonal structure of the following studies and songs should 
be fully analyzed before attempting to read them at sight. 

I. 




j P^z4 



±=:d 



=t 



d=d: 



* 0- 



=t 



-&- 



in. 

zfc 



feg 



=t 



L -(S i - 



±±~ ^ * -gj £: 



-iS> 



F=P 



:±5 



3= 



1 1 ~tT" 



-*-#- - -t^—: 



:^^E^did=± 






d: 



□=r 



*^ 



t 



j~j: 









Mother's Prayer. 



s 



Agnes Stollberg. 

Andante do Ice 



Schulz. 



N— 



# — — 



A - 



_A_p=5r 



*-£^ 



? 



zzZS-f= 
/> 

1. Come to moth- er's lap, my dear, Come and rest there peacefully ; 

2. As you sleep, dear, mother prays That your feet, in la - ter hours, 
8. "When her ba - by comes and lays Tir - ed head on mother's breast 



^i?y= 



%/ 



w #" 



:nz 



— f 



-0- 



9 w • 



Sleep, my ba - by, free from fear, Mother's love is guarding thee. 
May be led thro' pur - est ways, Rich in peace and fair-est flow'rs. 
Moth- er prays that manhood's days May be just as sweet and blest. 



m 



i. 

Largo. 



Studies in Time and Tune. 
Songs. 



123 

Part of a Melody of the XV Century. 



*£ 



-^L 



A #. 



:r; 



A-Z£Z. 



t- 



-\~ 



75> &~ 



» 



g — # — # — ^ 



q: 



zr 



---&&=& 



L i I 



V- 



.9 (fi_ 



« 



czt=± 



"2?" 



^ 



■ I 1 I 



-# — #- 



sn 



ii. 

Moderate. 



:q=j=q: 






4= 



_#_#. 



l=M=fr 



German Folksong. 



»~~* 



1= 



t 



3=4 



ti=t: 



"2T 



» * « 



tr+zt: 



?-«—»—#- 



F 



&=±J. 



=2=t=fc 



#— # 



^fe^ 



d: 



•/5*-r 



JJ 



HI. 



French Melody. 






-N- 



H4S 



pfc=t 



._A — ?v — p — ._. N __ 

-H 1 a 1 

« « g=»— 



=^=~ 



~\ h 



-A H 



9 



i — n — ^^ — \ — \- 

H 1 P P 

• • 9 9- 



fefell 



Morning Song. 



Hoffmann v. Fallersleben. 

Moderate. — =--- 



Gersbach. 



^ 



:q=q: 



3 



C=t 



±- z -&- 



=J 



::i 



.j 



1. The twink-ling stars have van - ished, The moon its light has 

2. A sun-beam strays and glan - ces O'er val-ley and o'er 

3. They sing their morn-ing prais - es To our Cre - a - tor 



$ 



-&-*-■ 



t= 



:=i 



d=^=zizz 



— h" 



-&- 



: F 



:q: 



-¥- 



3 



11 



shed, And now the night is ban-ished And day comes in its stead. 

hill, And 'mid the dew-decked branches The hap-py song birds trill. 

mild Who watches ev - er o'er us And guards each lit- tie child. 



124 



Studies in Time and Tune. 
A Cloudy Day. 



4-- 



E 
E 



if 






._L 



& 



! 



_| L 

"9 9' 



■± 



& 



-&- 






_L 



-<S> 



Pll 



The Wind Mill. 



r^tr^rir^t^cqzji^zz^ 



E3E53 



4=» 



#_ # . 



tt: 



3^ 



:±: 



S^ 



=£»= 



-^-t 



!l 






c=t 



~73—&~ 



A Little Hymn. 



._i 



g> — g? — ^ £? 



-*s> — 



q=z 



i r 



<£? 



-f^- 



t=t 



-^-^- 



-& 



-&—&- 



-&.—&. 



Bzzfc 



~&-&- Y rt-72 



'-&—&- 



•<g~g^- 



^i 



Bedtime. 



Frederick Manley. 



John Martin. 



* 



.J. 



._J_ 
-#- 



n= 






t: 



;_j rj 



1. Ba - by ti - gers, ba - by bears, El - e-pbants and buf-fa-loes, 

2. Ev - 'ry- where for play's too dark, Dear old pa - pa sun has gone; 

3. In the jun- gles wild you've run,Un- der ta - bles, un-der beds; 

I 



=q=j= 



- ! " 



.j 






-r- 



zztt 



II 



March to -geth-er from your lairs; See ! the day is near its close. 
Come in - to your co - sy ark; Best till morn-ing, ev - 'ry one. 
Now the time for play is done, You can rest your tir - ed heads. 



The First Robin. 



125 



Ha 






■# *" 



: ~t~ — g ~ " 



^ 



3 



To-day I heard a robin sing, And since I have been wondering, What 




made him think that it is Spring When all the world is shiv-er ing. 



The Snow-drop. 



Rebecca B. Foresman. 




pt 



:j: 



5EE 



-6- 






1. The last few flakes of Win-ter's snow, The first new green of 

2. The sun, too, saw the lit - tie flow'r,Andwarm'd its heart of 

3. And sun, and snow,and wind, and cold Ee-mem-bered it was 



=iii 



Lffn" !; J^-j-J - 






#— # 



1]] 



it 



Spring, Met in my garden, and I found A snow-drop blossoming. 

gold ; The wind blew softly when he saw The snow-drop in the cold. 

Spring, When in my garden they beheld The snow-drop blossoming. 



The Face in the Brook. 



Reoecca B. Foresman. 



\m f\ j j J4J, 



t 



:q: 



=F 



=t=±= 



1. pret-ty lit-tle sil-verbrook,Wheninyour shining face I look, I 

2. I turn my head,she turns hers,too, Oh, please, dear brook,oh,tcll me true, What 




qzp:nzz:_ 



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z£ 



see a lit - tie girl like me, Oh, who, I won-der, can it be ! 
is this lit - tie maiden's name ? I half be-lieve mine is the same. 



J ^° Comparative Time Values of Notes and Rests. 

Rests have time values corresponding to notes. 



Whole rest. Half rest. 



5-» 



a = — ■ 



2? 



j 






/= 
* = * ? 



J. 



•£ or f or ^r 
Quarter rests. 

j=j J 



is rs fs 
# * * 



Eijjhth rest. Sixteenth rest. 






fc 






J 
1 



fS IS 



•r •? 



j.= j j j 



4 
4 



2? 

J 



Different Ways to Fill a Measure* 



PS is rs 



J 
J J 



, s //// / 



2 

4 



4 



* 

4 



J 



-8- 



J. 

IS 

4 - 
I 



# 4 • 



/ / 



J 



S 



s 



The teacher should put different combinations on the blackboard for drill. 
The following method is suggested for analyzing the rhythm of a song: 



A Friend in Need. (Page 66.) 



2^ 



} f «r ^ J i J" f / f J i 

f f f f I jN f JS JS j f f "js-js j j J 



127 



COMMON ITALIAN TERMS USED IN MUSIC. 



A — in, at, to, according to, for. 

Ad libitum (Latin) — at pleasure. 

Alia — like, in the style of. 

Allegretto — somewhat quick. 

Allegro — quick, lively. 

Andante — walking, moderately quick. 

Andantino — a little slower than Andante; sometimes 

more rapid. 
Animato — with spirit. 

Vrescendo ( — ==::: C) — increasing in tone volume. 
£>a capo (D. C.) — from the beginning. 
Dal segno (Z). S.) or (j£)— from the sign. 
Diminuendo Cl^=-~) — dminishing in tone volume. 
Dolce — sweet, with expression. 
fine — end. 
Forte (/)— loud. 
Fortissimo (ff) — very loud. 
Grazioso — graceful. 
Larghetto — somewhat broad and slow. 
Largo — broad, very slow. 
Legato — connected. 



Lento — slow. 

Marcia — march ; alia marcia — marchiike. 

Mezzo (m) — half; mf. — not so loud as/. 

Moderato — moderate. 

Moto — motion. 

Non— not. 

Pianissimo (pp) — very soft. 

Piano (p) — soft. 

Piu — more; Piu forte — louder; Piu mosso — more 

rapid. 
Presto — very quick. 

Poco — little; Poco a poco — little bv little, gradually. 
Rallentando (rail.) — retarding motion. 
Ritardando (rit.) — retarding motion. 
Ritenulo (riten.) — holding back. 
Staccato — detached, disconnected. 
Tempo — time, movement. 
Tranquillo — tranquil. 
Vivace — lively. 
Voce — voice. 



INDEX. 



TITLE COMPOSER PAGE 

Air Ship, The French Folksong 84 

An Explanation Hanoverian Folksong . 31 

Apple-Tree, The French Folksong 18 

A-Riding Nicolai 64 

Asleep and Awake S. Rcid Spencer 102 

Autumn Days 118 

Barnyard, In a 117 

Bedtime Martin 124 

Bells in the Steeple 34 

Bees are Humming 59 

Big Drum, The Mark Seely 15 

Blacksmith, The Gruenberger 90 

Body-Guard, The 41 

Bogieman, The Old German 70 

Bouncing Ball 27 

Bugle Call, The Old German 54 

Butterfly, The Erwin Oehme 55 

Bunny and Polly 61 

Child's Evensong, A Stainer 78 

Child's Thanksgiving, A. . .John Martin 105 

Christmas Bells 44 

Christmas Time John Martin 104 

Christmas Tree, The , .Myles B. Foster 106 

Dairy Maids, The Cld English Tune. ... 9 

Daisies 42 

Dancing Song Rhenish Folksong .... 23 

Dancing Song Folksong 110 

Dew Drop, A W.W. Gilchrist 85 

Divided Beat, The 52, 53 

Dream, A 45 

Dustman, The Brahms 125 



TITLE COMPOSER ?AGW 

Early Spring 65 

Earth's Dresses 54 

Elephant, The 52 

Evening. Ernst Anschuetz 28 

Explanation, An 31 

Face in the Brook, The 125 

Father Christmas Folksong 57 

Fairies' Dance, The Eleanor Smith 48 

Firemen, The Elhelbert Nevin 88 

Five Little Girls 53 

Fox and Goose German Melody 39 

Friend in Need, A Wilhelm 66 

Frog-Making 46 

Fruit l.T. Wilson 29 

Gentleness 46 

Goldfinch, The Brahms 79 

Good News Cr. Jaspersen 62 

Gray Rain 58 

Guardian Angel, The. ! . . .Brahms 108 

Happy Eskimo, The Eleanor Smith 50 

Happy Little Alice Eleanor Smith 20 

Harvest Time 48 

Humming Bird, The 60 

Hurdy-Gurdy Man, The. . . Wilhelm 57 

In a Barnyard 117 

Indian Summer 4S 

In May Old English 46 

Jacky Frost Eleanor Smith 80 

January and February 49 

Journey's End, The Eugene Loop 22 

Joyful Days Wilhelm 72 



128 



INDEX. 



TITLE COMPOSER PAGE 

Jumping Johnny Nursery Rhyme 49 

Keys 

Key of A 33 

Key of A Flat 43 

Key of B Flat 39 

Key of C 27 

Key of D 31 

Key of E 35 

Key of E Flat 41 

Key of F 37 

Key of G 29 

King of France, The 47 

Lady-Bird French Melody 58 

Lady Daffadown 29 

Left, Right 49 

Little Gypsy Dandelion. . .Eleanor Smith 10 

Little Pilgrims F. H. Arkwright 44 

Little Trolls are Spinning, 

The Eleanor Smith 101 

London Bridge Old Tune 32 

Lullaby German Air 32 

Marching 22 

May's Coming German 11 

May, In Old English 46 

May Time Naegeli 19 

Make-Believe Town Adapted from Gruen- 

berger 17 

Mill- Wheel, The 30 

Mix a Pan-Cake Childhood Days 38 

Moon, The. 17 

Morning Glory, The G.W. Chadwick 74 

Mouse Cousins 34 

Months, The 62 

Month of May, The Eleanor Smith 93 

Morning Prayer Rheinberger 99 

Morning Song English 76 

Morning Song Gersbach 123 

Mother's Prayer Schulz 122 

Mournful Linnets, The. . . . Children's Song 42 

My Cap 81 

Ji, > -i + rv, 'Tis of Thee. . Carey 109 

My Dolly French Folksong 12 

Mystery, A K.G. Hering 98 

Naming the x °es Folksong 10 

Now the Day k Jver Rinck 110 

October J. K.G. Loewe 87 

On a Snowy Day Old German 55 

Open the Gates as High as 

the Sky 78 

Owl, T*,e Ethelbert Nevin 73 

Playing Horse 116 

Polly's Piano 26 

Ponies, The French 52 

Prayer, A Kreuz 107 

Prisoners 36 

Pussy Nursery Sojigs 27 

Pussy Cat, Pussy Cat J.W. Elliott 36 

Pussy Cat 116 



TITLE COMPOSER PAGB 

Rain, The G. Jaspersen 37 

Raindrops, The 27 

Rain Song Eleanor Smith 86 

Reason Why, The German. . , 28 

Rider on the Rocking- 

Horse Taubert 94 

Ring, The J.W. Elliott 100 

Ring Around a Rosy Reinecke 21 

Robin and the Redbreast, The 47 

Robin in the Cherry-Tree, 

Tiie n 

Robin's Rain Song 64 

Robin's Return Carl Attenhofer 16 

Signs of Rain German Folksong. ... 36 

Signs of the Weather Old Folksong 15 

Sing a Song of Workshops.. G. W. Chaduick 20 

Silk Worm, The 30 

Sleigh Ride, A 47 

Sleighing Song Old Tune 52 

Snowbirds, The Reissmann 35 

Snowbird's Message, The. . Wilhelm 12 

Snowing and Blowing German Folksong .... 34 

Soldier's Song Old English Game 16 

Song to Venus 67 

Special Studies 68 

Spider, The Folksong 23 

Spring is Coming J. A. Martin 32 

Squirrel, The German Folksong. ... 30 

Squirrel, The Eleanor Smith 13 

Squirrel's Tea, The French Air 14 

Stars and Dewdrops Witthauer 51 

Streamlet, The 63 

Studies in Time and Tune 24, 25, 112-124 

Summer or Winter From Nursery Songs. . 29 

Swallow, The Folksong 81 

Ten O'Clock 65 

Thank You, Pretty Cow 59 

Three Plum Buns 41 

Tick, Tock Children's Songs 28 

Time Study 24, 110 

Time to Rise 26 

Topsy-Turvey John Martin 75 

Trees, The Ancient Folksong. ... 10 

Tune : 25 

What a Good Child Says 116 

What the Robin Sings . . . .Eleanor Smith 97 

When the Little Children 

Sleep Reinecke 96 

When the Stars Dr. Garrett 101 

Wind, The English 45 

Wind, The W.W. Gilchrist 102 

Winds of Evening French Melody 13 

Windmill, The German Air 14 

Winter's Music German Folksong. ... 14 

Woodpecker, The Ethelbert Nevin 82 

Work and Play Wilhelm 74 

Wrens and Robins 23 

Young Jasons, The Brandenburg Folksong 40 



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*